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Samford 
University 

800 

Lakeshore 

Drive 

Birmingham, 

AL 35229 

Editor: 
Tiffany 

Townsend 



I ENTRE 
NOUS 
1993 



•e-During the 
Homecoming week 
festivities, a 
brilliant bonfire lit 
up the Birmingham 
sky as Samford 
students prepared 
for the fiercely 
competitive football 
game the following 
afternoon. 

Photo by K.T. Harrell 



OPENING** 1 



•» Refreshing 
memories of the late 
winter Samford saw, 
the snow-covered 
belltower remains 
an emblem of the 
principles on which 
the university was 
founded. 



Photo bv Mark Mamooth 




ife is comprised of a sequence of pas- 
sages.* The passage from infancy to 
childhoods The passage from childhood 
to adolescence.* The passage from ado- 
lescence to adulthood* We are con- 
stantly passing from one stage of life to 
another.* As we are "initiated" into 
adulthood we participate in certain rites: 
acquiring additional responsibilities, 
getting our first taste of the "real" world, 
depending on ourselves, securing that 
first job, making life-altering choices.® 
These are the rites through which we 
travel from adolescent to adults These 

are OUr rites Of passage.* Tiffany Townsend 





V 



2 •* Opening 



CONTENTS 




OPENING-* 3 




•* Freshman Joel 
Mixon gets a big hug 
from his sister, 
Amy, and friend, 
Laura Beth Large, 
after receiving a bid 
from Sigma Chi. 

Photo by Buck Buchanan 




s we journey through our college years 
here at Samford, we struggle through 
many rites of passage from adolescence 
to adulthood.*Through campus activities 
we observe the rites of life.*Through 
intramurals and intercollegiate sports 
programs, we see the rites of the game 
exemplified* The organizations we join 
help us pass through our rites of ini- 
tiation.^ Our rites of knowledge are ac- 
quired in the academic world, and from 
the many professors who inspire us to 
succeed.* The rites of service are de- 
veloped, as our spiritual lives are en- 
hanced, through participation in min- 
istry programs. # All these elements 
must be fine tuned as we travel through 
college— to help us become well- 
rounded individuals ready to face the 
"real" world of adulthood.© 



Tiffany Townsend 



4 •* Opening 



CONTENTS 




OPENING^ 5 




.J** ^i»j 







Welcome Back 


8-11 


Fall Carnival 


12-13 


Miss Samford 


14-16 


Step Sing 


25-29 


Homecoming 


30-33 


Intramurals 


34-35 






Spring Fling 



36-37 



6 •* Division 




Mark Mantooth 



■* Enjoying the 
snow sophomore 
Rachel Dvvyer tries 
her hand at making 
a snow angel. 



CAMPUS LIFE •* 7 



Welcome Back '92 



Hawaiian Style Welcome 



From the Ha- 
waiian flair of 
Kele's Pacific 
Paradise to a 
taste of reggae by 
Roots Posse, 
Welcome Back 
week greeted 
students with an 
"aloha" from 
Samford Island. 

The week be- 
gan with Samford 
Star Search fi- 
nals. Entering 
freshman per- 
formed their 



talents for 
other students 
in the Wright 
Concert Hall. 
They proved to 
be, once again, 
"Unforget- 
table," as Joel 
Mixon sang. 

The Hawaiian 
theme contin- 
ued with Din- 
ner on the Dirt. 
Freshman, 
Renee Wade 
felt, "we could 
have done 




K.T. Harrell 



•*With lays around their necks, students socialize at Dinner on 
the Dirt in a Hawaiian atmosphere. 

•* Sitting around for dinner on the ground, students participate 
in Welcome Back activities. 




•» Brian Finch and Kevin Jackson 
perform at Howard's during Welcome Back. 



K T. Harrell 



8 •* Welcome Back 




•» Billy Ivey 
sings lead with the 
popular campus 
band, Sir Real, at 
Howard's and 
entertains the 
crowd. 




K.T. Harrell 



•» Dean Franklin 
seems a little out of 
character learning 
the hula in front of 
a crowd of 
hysterical students. 

Photo bv K.T. Harrell 



CAMPUS LIFE •* 9 



without the 
stuffed pig." 
However, the 
island tropics 
were soon for- 
gotten when 50 
degree weather 
set in and 
"Hook" movie- 
goers found the 
wet grass on 
Rhea Rhea field 
wasn't as com- 
fortable as the- 
ater seats. Wel- 
come Back was 
certainly unfor- 
gettable for 
Dean Traylor 
who found 
himself, along 
with some stu- 
dents, dancing 
in a grass skirt 
learning to hula 



at the Luau. 

By Tuesday, 
tropics were out 
and reggae was 
in with Roots 
Posse at Sloss 
Furnace. But not 
everyone had an 
easy time getting 
into the Jamai- 
can groove. 
Mary Abigail 
Sessions said, "I 
think the upper- 
classmen inten- 
tionally gave the 
freshman the 
wrong map so 
we would get 
lost!" 

Later in the 
week, students 
had a chance to 
get involved at 
Vision '92, 



Church Rush, 
and the 
Samford vs. 
West Georgia 
pep rally and 
football game 
that finished 
the week off 
with a 44 to 16 
victory. 

But whether 
students were 
in the stands, 
on the dirt, or 
jammin' to the 
beat of steel 
drums, Wel- 
come Back week 
definitely 
greeted every- 
one with an 
"aloha" from 
Samford Is- 
land." 



•» Leigh Sherer learns to do the "hula" 
from some native Hawaiian dancers. 

K.T. Harrell 





K. T. Harrell 



K. T. Harrell 



■• Joel Mixon sings and plays a variety of songs 
that are "Unforgettable" for the audience. 



•» Becky Stoltz sings a beautiful song at the 
Freshman Star Search finals. 



10 ^Welcome Back 




K.T. Harrell 



■• Gary Byrum, Jenny Fowler, Melissa Belcher, and Shannon Tripp talk about old times at Sloss 
Furnace. 



CAMPUS LIFE •* 11 



Fall Carnival '92 



Carnival Madness! 



The annual 
Fall Carnival was 
held October 
31st offering 
students food, 
fun and excite- 
ment on the 
quad after a 
football game. 
Campus Minis- 
tries sponsored 
Fall Carnival 
which helped 
raise money for 



upcoming sum- 
mer missions. 

Various cam- 
pus organiza- 
tions set up 
booths and 
participated. 
Some of the 
features in- 
cluded: music, 
the traditional 
Lambda Chi 
dunking tank, a 
balloon break, 



and a candy 
apple stand for 
those with a 
sweet tooth. 
Typical carnival 
foods were a 
popular choice 
for a light snack. 
Fall Carnival 
offered a lot of 
excitement and 
had something 
fun for every- 
one! 





K. T. Uarrell 



•* David Bethune gives it his best shot at 
the dunking tank. 

■» Alpha Delta Pi enjoys their own candy- 
apple booth. 

•» Nancy Watson and Joy Kolb enjoy the 
carnival La Fiesta style. 




K.T. H.urell 



K.T. Hjrrell 



12 •* Fall Carnival 




K.T. Harrell 




••■Amy Heise tries her luck at fishing. 

•» These friendly animals sell balloons 
and popcorn for a more carnival 
atmosphere. 

■» Larry McFarlin, Lisa Fields, Burt 
Rushing and Jeff Archer look excited at 
J the Alpha Kappa Psi Balloon Break. 



Buck Buchanan 




K.T. Harrell 



CAMPUS LIFE •* 13 



1993 Miss Samford 



Crowned in Her Glory! 



In late No- 
vember contes- 
tants covered 
the Wright 
Center stage, 
seeking to claim 
the title of Miss 
Samford 1993. 
The Master of 
Ceremonies was 
Mr. Mike Royer, 
a local televi- 
sion journalist. 
Entertainment 
was provided 
by Resha 
Riggins Tate, 



Julie Coons Will- 
iams, Christie 
Blanton, and 
Leigh Sherer, all 
former Miss 
Samfords. Enter- 
tainment was 
also provided by 
nine Miss 
Samford escorts, 
they included: 
David Bethune, 
Wayne 

Cancienne, Scott 
Gassner Brooke 
Holbert, Cheal 
Mellard, Heath 



Morris, Jason 
Murphree, Jamie 
Spencer, and 
Michael Tate. 

The competi- 
tion, an official 
preliminary for 
the Miss Ala- 
bama pageant, 
was judged on 
interviews, 
swimsuits, tal- 
ent, and evening 
gowns. The top 
five finalists 
were: Angie Hill, 
Shannon Lee, 




K.T. Harrell 



•«■ The top five finalists were: Angie Hill, Jenni Crumpton, 
Jennifer Wilson, Shannon Lee, and Ronni Miller. 

•♦ Jenni Crumpton is saluted in the top five evening gown 
competition. 




Ronni Miller, 
Jenni Crumpton, 
and Jennifer 
Wilson. Contes- 
tants chose 
Dana Daniel as 
Miss Congenial- 
ity, and talent 
winners not in 
the top ten were 
Julianne Ander- 
son and Heather 
Bartlett. 

The 1993 Miss 
Samford winner 
was Miss Jenni- 
fer Wilson. 



Wilson is a 
psychology and 
theater major 
from 

Childersburg, 
Ala. She also 
received a 
scholarsip to 
cover half of her 
spring tuition, a 
$300 gift certifi- 
cate and a Bible. 
She will compete 
in the 1993 Miss 
Alabama pageant 
this summer. 




K.T. Harrell 



•» Angie Hill performs a lyrical ballet 
to "Amazing Grace" for her talent. 



K.T. Harrell 



14 •<> Miss Samford 



■*■ Top five finalist, Shannon Lee 
performs her vocal talent for the 
audience. 




K.T. Harrell 



K.T. Harrell 



•* Dana Daniel receives the Miss 
Congeniality award which is voted on 
by the contestants. 



•*• Miss Jennifer Wilson, a sophomore from Trussville, Alabama was 
crowned Miss Samford 1993. She will represent Samford at the 1993 
Miss Alabama Pageant. 



CAMPUS LIFE .0 15 



Competition 





K. T. Harrell 



K. T. Harrell 



•*■ Shannon Bowman, sponsored by Delta Omicron, performs •♦ Tonya Green, from Pleasent Grove, Ala., 
her operatic talent. p erforms "Where the Boys Are." 

•«- Top ten finalist Susan Mathis sings "I'd 
Give My Life for You" 



•*• 1993 Miss Samford, Leigh Sherer is escorted for her 
final walk, by E. J. Smith. 




K. T. U.irrell 



K. T. Harrell 



16 •* Miss Samford 




•» Travis Dickson, John Thomas, Karen Luker, Laura 
Lethridge and Mr. Beeson enjoyed two days off from 
school during the Blizzard of '93. 



MINI MAG ^17 



WORLD 



The House of Windsor 

struggles through 

family turmoil 



Rebecca Rowell 
Staff Reporter 

Not since 
1936, the year 
Edward VIII gave 
up his throne, 
has the House of 
Windsor been 
under such fire 
as it has been in 
1992. Queen 
Elizabeth II has 
not had to relin- 
quish her throne 
this year, but 
not one of her 
children have 
been able to 
create a work- 
able marriage. 

With possible 



affairs and 
obvious marital 
turmoil, it would 
be unthinkable 
for Charles and 
Diana to become 
the next King 
and Queen. 
How could they 
when they can- 
not control their 
home life? 

The Queen's 
other three have 
not been suc- 
cessful in mar- 
riage either, 
with Princess 
Anne divorced, 
Prince Andrew 
and the famous 
"Fergie" sepa- 



rated, and 
Prince Edward 
not yet showing 
interest in mar- 
riage at all. 

Apparently, 
the royal life is 
not as wonderful 
as it seems. 
Diana and 
Fergie have not 
experienced the 
fairy-tale 
lifestyle of prin- 
cesses. 

With all these 
unfortunate 
circumstances 
where does that 
leave the royal 
family? 




Life 



•» Charles and Di hide their inner troubles 
while appearing in public with their sons, 
William and Harry. 



U.S. Forces seek to restore hope 



Bonnie Siler 
Section Editor 

The mission 
was "to open 
supply routes 
and to get 
food moving," 
said President 
Bush. General 
Colin Powell 
said the mis- 
sion was 



"splendid". 

Set up solely 
to aid the starv- 
ing people, 
Operation Re- 
store Hope sent 
17,000 troops of 
U.S. Army sol- 
diers and Ma- 
rines to the 
drought-stricken 
African country 
to make this 



happen. 

The Interna- 
tional Commit- 
tee of the Red 
Cross delivered 
20,000 tons of 
food a month to 
Somalia. 

With the help 
of the UN, the 
U.S. accom- 
plished their 
mission. 




U.S. News and World Report 



Somalians await their chance for hope. 



18 ■* Mini Mag 



NATIONAL 




U. S. News and World Report 



NtWJiWhtR PULL 

If the election were held 
today, whom would you 
vote for? 

CURRENT 
31% Bush 
46% Clinton 
14% Perot 

OCT. 9, 1992 

35% Bush 
44% Clinton 
12% Perot 

NEwsnax Poll. Oct. 15-16, 1992 



Newsweek 



If you could vote 
separately for vice 
president, whom would 
you vote for? 

61% Gore 
28% Quayle 
6% Stockdale 

Newsweek Poll. Oct 15-16. 1992 



Newsweek 



NEWSWEEK POLL 

Are you satisfied with 
Clinton's response to 
reports about his anti- 
war activities and his 
visit to the Soviet Union 
while he was a student 
at Oxford? 

56%Yes 33%No 

Was the Bush adminis- 
tration's check of Clin- 
ton's State Department 
files from this period 
proper or improper? 

31% Proper 
59% Improper 

NewswekPoII Ocl 15-16 1992 



Newsweek 



•*• Former President Bush welcomes President Clinton to his new home hours before 
the Presidential Inauguration. 



MINI MAG •* 19 



NATIONAL 



Change arrives at the White House 



Amy Armstrong 
Staff Reporter 

Some sat in 
awe, some sat in 
disbelief, others 
just sat-in front 
of their televi- 
sion waiting to 
see into whose 
hands our 
troubled coun- 
try would be 
thrust. Finally 
over was six 
months of hard 
campaigning 
from both the 
incumbent 
Bush/Quayle 
ticket and their 
opponents, Bill 
Clinton with 
running mate Al 
Gore. 

Tuesday, 
November third 
had never been 
more antici- 
pated by mil- 
lions of Ameri- 
cans. Why was 
this election 
such a big deal? 
Because it was 
the first election 
in 1 2 years in 
which the candi- 
dates were run- 
ning neck and 
neck up until 
the very end. 

Only 20 
months before 
the election, 
George Bush 
enjoyed the 
highest approval 



rating ever 
recorded follow- 
ing the U.S.'s 
victory in the 
Persian Gulf. 
The chance of 
Bush losing was 
improbable. 
The chance that 
he might lose to 
the young, 
virtually un- 
known governor 
of one of the 
smallest and 
poorest states in 
the nation was 
unbelievable. 




Time 



■* Perot and Stockdale rally their supporters for the upcoming 
election. 




Time 



•* On election night, Bill and Hillary Clinton and Al Gore celebrate the long-awaited 
victory. 



20 •* Mini Mag 



NATIONAL 




U.S. News and World Report 



•» Newly elected President Clinton and First Lady Hillary 
Clinton greet Arkansas supporters on Election night. 

r 1 -m^ 



Yet as the cam- 
paign moved 
into its final 
week, that was 
precisely what 
seemed likely to 
happen. The 
country 
chanted, "We 
want change" 
and that is 
exactly what it 
got. Bill Clinton 
was the new 
president of the 
United States. 

Samford stu- 
dents were 
especially atten- 
tive during the 
election. Sup- 
porters for both 
parties were 
actively cam- 
paigning for 
their candidate. 




Backpacks and 
cars became 
moving bill- 
boards as most 
students at- 
tached either 
Bush or Clinton 
buttons and 
bumper-stickers. 
Opinions were 
voiced, debates 
were held and 
editorials were 
written. 

The climax 
was election 
day, and stu- 
dents all over 
campus sat 
nervously in 
front of their 
televisions 
awaiting the 
outcome. When 
Clinton was 
designated the 
victor cheers as 
well as boos 
could be heard. 
Some just 
breathed a sigh 
of relief. The 
elections were 
over, we had a 
new president, 
and we had 
made history! 



U.S. News and World Report 



The Bush and Quayle families bid their final farewells from the White House. 



MINI MAG •* 21 



NATIONAL 



Andrew: From storm to horror story 



Jackie Colavita 
Section Editor 

For those who 
did not experi- 
ence it, Hurri- 
cane Andrew 
was simply a 
horror story. For 
those who lived 
it, it was much 
more than a 
story, it was a 
life-threatening 
disaster. 

Between the 
dates of August 
23-25, Andrew 
pounded the 
coasts of Florida 



and Louisiana. 

At the peak of 
the storm in 
Florida, Andrew 
left at least 15 
people dead, 
700 injured, 
63,000 home- 
less, and 3 mil- 
lion residents 
without power 
and water. The 
estimated dam- 
age was between 
$15 and $20 
billion. "It 
looked like an 
atomic bomb 
hit," commented 
one Florida 




Z-OOTt & I 



Time 



•«• This resident of Florida must 
protect what little he does have left 
before beginning any kind of 
rebuilding. 



resident. 

Louisiana was 
hit 20 miles west 
of New Orleans, 
and the storm 
devastated that 
state leaving at 
least 30 injured 
and countless 
others without 
power. 

Several vic- 



tims of the 
hurricane had to 
ward off looters 
before they 
could begin 
surveying the 
damage of their 
own homes. 

For a storm 
that weather 
experts thought 
would disinte- 



grate quickly, 
Andrew fooled 
them all with 
winds as high as 
165 miles per 
hour. It was 
definitely the 
most destructive 
storm in U.S. 
history. 




•* Homestead, Fla. lies shattered by Andrew's vicious path. 



22 •©> Mini Mag 



LOCAL 




The Tide rolls over 
Gators and 'Canes' 



Sports Illustrated 



•» Gene Stallings celebrates the Tide's 
victory over the Gators at the SEC 
Championship game. 



Bonnie Siler 
Section Editor 

In July of 
1991, represen- 
tatives from the 
city of Birming- 
ham and the 
Southeastern 
Conference 
agreed to bring 
the first South- 
eastern Football 
Championship 
game to Legion 
Field. In 1992 it 
would take place 
on December 5. 

Birmingham 
was filled with 
excited anticipa- 
tion for the 




unpcommg 
event. 

"We are ex- 
tremely happy 
with the out- 
come of the 
contract nego- 
tiations," said 
Alan Martin, 
President of the 
Birmingham 
Football Founda- 
tion. 

Up until late 
fall everything 
was in place for 
the big game 
except the 
teams. Those 
playing would 
be the winners 
of the newly 
divided Eastern 
and Western 
Divisions. The 
winner of the 
championship 
game would 
represent the 
SEC at the 
USF&G Sugar 
Bowl against the 
Miami Hurri- 
canes. 

The two teams 
to play were the 
Alabama Crim- 
son Tide vs. the 
Florida Gators. 

Photo from Sports Illustrated 



On Dec. 5 over 
83,000 fans 
filled Legion 
Field. 

With a final 
score of 28-21 
the Tide headed 
for New Orleans 
to face the Hur- 
ricanes of Mi- 
ami. 

The Alabama 
defense took 
Miami's quarter- 
back, Gino 
Torretta by 
surprise. 
"Torretta didn't 
know what was 
going on," said 
Alabama 
cornerback 
Tommy 

Johnson. Look- 
ing at the final 
score, 34-13, it 
appeared that 
Miami was con- 
fused all four 
quarters. 

Alabama came 
as SEC champs, 
left as Sugar 
Bowl champs 
and better yet a 
National Cham- 
pionship team. 



•* Running back, Sherman Williams 
escapes the grasp of another Hurricane for 
an Alabama touchdown. 



MINI MAG •* 23 



LOCAL 



Storm of the Century 



Bonnie Siler 
Section Editor 

Weather fore- 
casters pre- 
dicted the big 
snow at the 
beginning of the 
week. However, 
Birmingham, 
lying in the 
middle of the 
southeast, did 
not take the 
forecast seri- 



ously. 

Friday, March 
12 at approxi- 
mately 8 a.m., 
snow began to 
fall, though it 
did not stick. By 
10 a.m. it had 
completely 
stopped. 

Samford took 
precautions by 
cancelling all 
classes after 
noon for fear 



» 




%T§ 





the storm would 
hit and students 
would be 
stranded on 
campus. Sure 
enough, by that 
afternoon the 
snow came 
again, and this 
time it was 
sticking. 

On campus as 
soon as things 
shut down Fri- 
day afternoon, 
students began 
making plans 
for their ven- 
tures in the 
snow. First, 
stealing cafete- 
ria trays for 
sledding down 
hills. Then, 
going to the 
fraternity 
houses for band 
parties. Then, 
more sledding, 
snowball fights, 
etc. 

By Saturday 
morning be- 
cause of the 
strong winds, 
snow drifts at 
least four feet 
deep held build- 
ing doors shut 
and power lines 
were down all 
over Birming- 
ham. Samford 
lost power 

Photo h\- Mark Mantooth 




Mark Mantooth 



•*Say Saysombath challenges the snowy 
conditions by biking through the stadium. 






around 11a.m. 
Saturday morn- 
ing. 

Because of no 
electricity in the 
cafeteria stu- 
dents rationed 
what food they 
had. Students 
worked with 
faculty and staff 
to provide for 
everyone to the 
best of their 
ability. 

Those students 
with four-wheel 
drive vehicles 
ventured out in 
the blizzard to 
go to Vincent's 
to buy necessi- 
ties for those 



who could not 
get out. 

By Saturday 
night the power 
was restored to 
West Campus, 
but Central 
Campus was still 
without electric- 
ity. 

It was not 
until Tuesday 
that electricity 
was completely 
restored. 

The storm 
made such an 
impact, t-shirts 
were made 
saying, "I sur- 
vived the Bliz- 
zard of '93!" 



The winter wonderland is draped across campus. 



• <- ^&>!ini Mag 



Step Sing '93 



One To Remember! 



The 42nd 
annual Step Sing 
show took place 
in late February 
in the Wright 
Center Concert 
Hall. This years' 
Masters of Cer- 
emony were 
Amy Cheek, a 
junior from 
Birmingham, 
and Matt Cook a 
senior from 
Lawton, Okla- 
homa. Amy 
Mixon, a sopho- 
more from 
Pensacola, 
Florida was the 
comic narrator. 

The show 
began with an 
opening number 
entitled Sight, 



Sound and 
Imagination! 
Songs from 
"Stealing Home" 
and Steven 
Curtis 

Chapman's "The 
Great Adven- 
ture" were fea- 
tured. 

The first 
organizational 
act was given by 
Delta Zeta/Delta 
Omicron. They 
took a trip back 
in time to the 
days of classic 
television with 
theme songs 
from popular 
television shows 
as Happy Days, 
The Brady 
Bunch and 



Gilligan's Island. 

Pi Kappa 
Phi claimed the 
first place tro- 
phy for the men 
as well as the 
Sweepstakes 
with their Fall of 
Communism 
theme. They 
impressed the 
audience with 
their incredible 
performance of 
the Soviet Na- 
tional Anthem. 
They took the 
crowd to see 
how commu- 
nism spread 
throughout the 
world. They 
performed songs 
like "Back in the 
U.S.S.R" and 



"Winds of 
Change." 

The Bap- 
tist Student 
Union finished 
third in the 
mixed division 
with their 
American Family 
theme. Some of 
their songs 
included: "Tra- 
dition," "Down 
Home," and the 
Walton's theme. 

In their 
Mickey Mouse 
outfits, Alpha 
Delta Pi placed 
first in the 
women's divi- 
sion. Their 
lively Magic 
Kingdom theme 
welcomed the 



crowd to the 
wonderful world 
of Disney. They 
sang songs such 
as "Heigh-Ho," 
"The Bare 
Necesseties," 
and "When You 
Wish Upon a 
Star." 

Lambda 
Chi Alpha 
placed second in 
the mens divi- 
sion in boxing 
outfits with a 
theme of Boxing- 
Title Defense. 
Their songs 
included: the 
theme from 
"Rocky," "Hit Me 
With Your Best 
Shot," and "An- 
other One Bites 




Sigma Chi is all dressed up for their train ride! 



•* Chi Omega Let's the Sunshine In! 



CAMPUS LIFE •* 25 



Sight, Sound, 



the Dust." 

Zeta Tau 
Alpha took the 
audience down 
the highway 
with their mo- 
torcycle theme. 
Using road signs 
as props, Zeta 
sang songs like, 
"Life is a High- 
way," "Born to 
be Wild," and 
"Leader of the 
Pack." 



The BSU 
Choir sang 
about the Hu- 
man Body and 
used lots of 
Body Language 
to draw the 
crowd into their 
theme. They 
placed second in 
the mixed divi- 
sion with their 
"Footloose" and 
fun show. Some 
of their songs 



included 
"Brown-Eyed 
Girl," and "She's 
Got Legs." 

Brightly 
colored cos- 
tumes lit up the 
stage as Chi 
Omega per- 
formed their 
theme of Let the 
Sunshine In. 
They placed 
third in the 
women's divi- 



sion. They 
brought the 
crowd a little bit 
of sunshine with 
songs such as 
"Tomorrow," 
and "You are my 
Sunshine." 

Sigma Chi 
took the crowd 
on a Train Ride 
and placed third 
in their division. 
They sang 
"Party Train and 
"Conjunction 
Junction." 

Again this 
year the 
feashman class 
took the first 
place mixed 



division title. 
This year the 
theme was Ten- 
nessee. They 
toured the state 
of "Tennessee" 
and sang "Chat- 
tanooga Choo- 
Choo," and 
"Walking in 
Memphis." 

Phi Mu's 
theme was The 
British Invasion- 
Now That's Rock 
and Roll. They 
placed second in 
their division 
and sang hits 
from the Beatles 
and Queen. 

A new 




■* The Baptist Student Union tributes the American 
Family! 

"* Alpha Delta Pi sings songs from their Magic Kingdom 
theme. 





•• Pi Kappa Phi proudly displays their trophy! 



26 ^ Step Sing 




The Freshman class tributes Tennessee! 



■* Phi Mu sings songs of the British Invasion, Now 
That's Rock and Roll! 



Zeta Tau Alpha performs songs such as "Born to Be Wild" and "Country Road" in their Motorcycle theme. 




CAMPUS LIFE-* 27 



Imagination! 




addition to this 
year's show was 
an act by the 
faculty and 
staff. It was 
very entertain- 
ing and was a 
great end to the 
performance. 
They sang 
"Operator" and 
"Shout." 

In the 
middle of this 
years' show, 
The Wright 
Center Concert 
Hall had to be 
evacuated be- 



cause of a 
bomb threat. 
All of the audi- 
ence and acts 
had to wait 
outside in the 
cold as police 
searched the 
building for a 
bomb. The 
threat turned 
out to be a 
hoax, but con- 
testants will 
always remem- 
ber the Step 
Sing show that 
almost blew! 

Lisa Oliphant 



"* The people who made it happen: Pete 
Williams, Joel Mixon, Kevin Holley, Todd 
Jones, Dawn Fisher, Sean Nowell, Joey 
Thomas, Lee Wimberleyand Brian Dunn. 

"* Phi Mu reaches for the sky. They 
placed second in the women's division. 

"* Delta Zeta and Delta Omicron sing the 
Gilligan's Island theme song! 




28 •* Step Sing 




Pi Kappa Phi wins the overall sweepstakes trophy with a spectaular performance of the Fall of Communism. 



"* Delta Zeta and Delta Omicron performed together a lively 
show that featured reruns from many of our favorite shows. 



**■ Lambda Chi Alpha placed second in 
the men's division with their Boxing-Title 



theme. 




CAMPUS LIFE •* 29 



Homecoming f 92 



Reflections on the 40 f s 



The 1992 
Samford home- 
coming theme 
was a nostalgic 
reflection of the 
fabulous 40's. 
Students started 
early on Mon- 
day morning 
voting for one 
female and male 
representative 
from each class. 
That evening, 
homecoming 
officially began 
with the show- 
ing of the 1942 
classic movie, 



"Casablanca" at 
the Alabama 
theater. 

Tuesday night 
the student 
U.S.O. show was 
in Howard's. 
Students showed 
off their talents 
in an atmo- 
sphere 

reminiscient of 
World War II. 
Wednesday 
evening students 
enjoyed their 
normal caf food 
serenaded with 
big band tunes. 




Later that 
evening every- 
one was invited 
to learn ball- 
room dancing in 
Seibert gym to 
music of the 
40's. 

Thursday 
students en- 
joyed the enter- 
tainment of 
Truth, a Chris- 
tian contempo- 
rary group. The 
evening was 
topped off with 
coke floats in 
Howard's imme- 
diately following 
the concert. 

Friday was an 
eventful evening 
starting with a 




K.T. Harrell 



"* Friday night students show their 
support for the Bulldogs at the pep rally 
and bon fire. 

"* The fire is too hot for the brothers of 
Alpha Phi Omega as they enjoy the bonfire. 



•» Delta Zeta and Lambda Chi Alpha 
labored many "long hours" on their plane. 




Photographic Services 



30 ^Homecoming 




K.T. Harrell 




■* Andrea Jarvis , Deborah Silverstein 
and Lynn Hadden enjoy cotton candy in a 
mini carnival before the game. 

"* Freshmen, Paul Perryman, Matt 
Brewer and Mark Stevens show their 
support for the Bulldogs with their chests 
and faces painted. 

•*• Sean Nowell, Travis Luttrell, and 
Craig Henson perform a musical number at 
the second annual Samford Palace. 

K.T. Harrell 



K. T. Harrell 




CAMPUS LIFE •* 31 



celebration of 
the present and 
the past at the 
Samford Palace 
featuring a 
variety of talent 
from both stu- 
dents and 
alumni. A bon- 
fire was held in 
C.J. parking lot 
as students 
enjoyed a pep 
rally led by the 
cheerleaders 
and band. The 
night was set 
into motion with 
a float fest on 
the quad where 
different orga- 



nizations built 
their floats 
some till late 
hours of the 
night. 

Saturday 
arrived and 
along with it 
came a pre-game 
BBQJn the 
fieldhouse. Then 



students packed 
out the stands to 
watch the Bull- 
dogs beat South- 
east Missouri 
State by a score 
of 45 to 14. 
During halftime 
the homecoming 
presentation of 
the court. Beth 



Richardson and 
Frank McCravy 
were crowned 
Queen and King. 
The week hon- 
ored the men 
who were part 
of the U-12 unit 
stationed at 
Samford during 
World War II. 




•♦ Amanda Foster 
and Mike Lunsford 
represent the senior 
class. 



•» The chosen representatives from each of the classes, freshman Jenni Cook, 
sophomore Kari Schumann, junior Shannon Carter and seniors Beth Richardson, Amanda 
Foster and Laura Wright, are announced at the game. 

•* Seniors Beth Richardson and Frank McCravy are chosen homecoming queen and escort. 



32 •* Homecoming 




•» Kari Schumann 
andJonHenshaw 
represent the 
sophomore class. 







M7k Harrell 



K. T. Harrell 



CAMPUS LIFE** 33 



Intramurals 1992-93 



Friendly Competition! 



Intramurals 
drew large 
crowds and 
brought fierce 
competition 
within indepen- 
dent teams, 
sororities and 
fraternities. 
Students could 
compete in a 
variety of sports 
beginning in the 
fall. The big 
events as always 
were the foot- 
ball, basketball 
and Softball 
competitions, 
but other sports 
included: indoor 
soccer, ping- 
pong, wallyball, 
8-ball pool, putt- 
putt golf, tennis, 
racquetball, 
inner tube water 
polo, volleyball, 
bowling, bad- 
minton, and a 
sports trivia 
contest. 

Samford's 
sororities and 
fraternities 
competed all 
year for the 
"Intramural 
Champion" title. 
In the fraternal 
competition as 
of March 1993, 
the points were 
divided as fol- 



lows: Sigma Chi 
had the lead 
with 380, Sigma 
Nu had 265, 
Lambda Chi 
Alpha had 255, 
Pi Kappa Alpha 
had 175, and Pi 
Kappa Phi had 
145. Sigma Chi 
won both foot- 
ball and volley- 
ball, and 
Lambda Chi 
won basketball. 
In the women's 
competition, 
Zeta lead with 
280 points. The 
independent 
team the 
Komodos were 
not far behind 
with 250, Chi 
Omega had 195, 
Alpha Delta Pi 
had 150, and 
the Softball 
team had 140. 
Regard- 
less of the win- 
ners or losers, 
everyone knew 
it was the spirit 
of competition 
that made intra- 
mural competi- 
tion fun. 
Intramurals will 
continue to be a 
big part of life 
here at 
Samford. 




■* Jeff Beard contemplates his next move carefully in the 
basketball finals against Lambda Chi. The independent team won 
the championship. Team members also included: Jason Trummell, 
Ross Lankford, Judd Fleming, and Tony Webster. 



34 •* Intramurals 




"*■ Patrick Lowe rushes for more yardage. Sigma Nu placed 
second in the overall football competition. 

•*■ Angie Davidson of the softball team spikes the ball back at 
her opponent. 



K. T. Harrell 



•* Monica Seay gets ready to serve for 
her team, the Komodos. 



■» Kari Erickson blocks her opponent in a match against 
Zeta. 




K. T. Harrell 



K. T. Harrell 



CAMPUS LIFE •* 35 



Spring Fling 1993 



Party Samford Style 



The bands 
played, and the 
students rocked 
during Spring 
Fling 1993. The 
event, spon- 
sored by the 
SGA, was a time 
for students to 
relax and catch 
their breath 
before finals 
started looming 
on the horizons. 
Spring Fling was 
a time to chill 
out and listen to 
some hot tunes 
as music was the 
main course for 
this fun-filled 
weekend. 

Curiosity Shop 
performed as 
the headline 
band. The 
crowd got into it 
as the band gave 
a show that put 
everyone in a 
festive mood. 
Still, Curiosity 
Shop was far 
from the only 
great music 
deafening the 
ears of eager 
listeners. Along 
with them, 
numerous stu- 
dent bands 
turned up their 
amps and had 
their performers 
doing their best 



Jimi Hendrix 
impressions. 

"I had a great 
time this week- 
end and thought 
all the stuff they 
had set up for 
students to do 
was great," 
sophomore 
Debbie Sheffield 
said. "Having 
all the student 
bands was a 
great idea and 
made for a fun 
time." 

However, 
music wasn't all 
that was going 
on during 
Spring Fling. 
Students en- 
joyed activities 
such as a dunk- 
ing booth and 
Karokie video. 
And plenty of 
food was on 
hand to satisfy 
the most dis- 
criminating 
palates. 

The laughs 
and smiles told 
the story of 
Spring Fling 
1993. Food, 
folks and fun 

(and music) •* Enjoying the spirit of the weekend, Michael Bobbitt takes 

made for a great f u n advantage of his hula-hooping ability. 

time. AS One Buck Buchanan 

band member 
put it, "Dat's 
cool!" 

Lisa Oliphant 




36 •* Spring Fling 



As some of 
the weekend enter- 
tainment, Mike 
Ford, Will Allen 
and Scott Lundy 
perform in the 
battle of the bands. 

Buck Buchanan 



Enjoying the 
Spring Fling 
weekend, Christie 
Blanton takes a turn 
in the dunk tank. 

Buck Buchanan 




■* Adding to the entertainment, Jason 
Wallis leads his band in playing for the 



Buck Buchanan 



■* After a tough turn with the Space 
Walk, Eric Motley escapes for a breather. 



Buck Buchanan 



Campus Life^ 37 





Football 


40-48 


Baseball 


49-53 


Basketball 


54-61 


Cheerleading 


62-63 


Volleyball 


64-67 


Track 


68-69 


Cross Country 


70-71 


Softball 


72-73 


Tennis 


74-75 



Golf 



76-77 



38 •* Division 




K.T. Harrell 



•*Ray Brown tackles #22, preventing any gain on a play in the 
first Samford v. UAB game. The Bulldogs allowed no rites of 
passage to the Blazers. The final score was 35-3. 



ATHLETICS** 39 



A Winning Continuance 



•C-GAME I 

In the rain and 
mud, Samford 
won its season 
opener. On 
second posses- 
sion, quarterback 
Ben Wiggins 
gave the ball to 
fullback Lee Ellis, 
who scored from 
7 yards out. West 
Georgia re- 
sponded with 83 
yards in two 
minutes and 
brought the 
score to 7-6. 
Taking advantage 
of an intercep- 



tion, the Braves 
kicked a long 
field goal to get 
ahead 7-9. In the 
second quarter 
tailback Tank 
Edwards ran for 
57 yards to score 
again. 

Splashing back 
onto the field 
with a 14-9 lead, 
Edwards scored 
again, increasing 
the lead with 
Michael O'Neal's 
extra point to 21- 
9. O'Neal then 
added three more 
with a 32-vard 



field goal. West 
Georgia returned 
with a touchdown 
on a 57-vard pass. 

At 24-16 and 
time running 
out, Samford 
scored on three 
possessions. 
Wiggins ran in a 
1-yard TD and 
passed to Bryan 
Fisher for a 36- 
vard completion 
TD. With 20 
seconds remain- 
ing, senior quar- 
terback Mel 
Hackbarth 
handed off to 



tailback Damian 
Hines for a 1- 
yard run that 
added the final 
touchdown, 
making the final 
score 44-16. 

•* GAME II 

In the first 
confrontation 
with Auburn 
since 1945, 
Samford entered 
with a 0-23-1 
record. They tied 
the Tigers in 
1927. As the 
Birmingham 
News reported, 



Auburn was "just 
too much for 
outmanned 
Samford." In 
front of an esti- 
mated crowd of 
65,913 at Jordan- 
Hare Stadium in 
Auburn, the 
Tigers shut out 
Samford 55-0. 

The Bulldogs 
opened the game 
with two first 
downs, moving 
from the 26 to the 
48-yard line, but 
Auburn's 
Karekin 
Cunningham 

Photographic Senices 







m^J* 



V ~ r 



U***—^* m 



Sf 



1*3*3*4 



•t -icu-a7. m5?9J 



.19-;! 

iflr 



Hlii 



i trsl row: TeDarry] Marshall. Brian May, Rodney Hawkins. Ed Smith. Head Coach Tern Bowden. James Mosley, Roland Authoris. Mike O'Neal. Ryan Perry. 
Second row: Byram Bailey. Eric Skipwith. Ben Wiggins. Ron Green. Jody Roberts. Jon Cooley. Bart Yancey, Mel Hackbarth. Russ Nolen. Rich Olivastro. Mike Dale. 
Third row: Scott Mansell' Eric Turner. Ben Wicker, Jason Lee. Damian Hines, Donja Graham. Derek Stales-. James Mizell. Tim McCool. Marcus Durgin. Michael 
Word. Fourth row: Lee Ellis. Erick Johnson. Darrell Murray, Ray Brown. Surkano Edwards, Karl Craig, Carlton Golden, Shawn Williams. Corey O'Neal, Tony 
Alvarez, Walter Britt. Fifth row: Derek Montgomery, Briscb Decembert, Sherman Collins. Bobby Emerson. Mike Battles. Jeremy Perkins. Kenny Jones, Orlando 
Reynolds, Brock Deitz. Allen Murphv, Wvati Hooks.' Sixth row: Tom Call. Walter Costner. Ryan' Lawrence, Brad Mangus. Larry McFarlin. Dawson Ingram, Chad 
Mobley, Josh Ogden, Hunter Carroll. Brister Packer. Greg Huffstatler. Seventh row: Chad Eads. Adrian Harris. Collin Thompson. Lance Mattes. Chris Bakersfield. 
Mike Carpenter, Jermaine Duckworth. Joey Winchester. Vince Noblitt. Jon Vernon. Mark Thomas. Eighth row: Jerry Fuqua. Karl Justus, Jack Hines. Tony Ierulli, 
Clint Conque, Tim Richardson, Bob Stinch'comb. Jimbo Fisher. Todd Stroud. Don Little. Greg Lipscomb. Ninth row: Ton James. Jamie Peterson. Patrick Edwards. 
Antonio Love, Caldwell Hartlev. Jute Wilson, Steve Miles. Mike Smith. Scott Friedel. Jason Loscuiko. Tenth row: Scott McFadden. Wendell Magee. Jeff Morris. Bryan 
Fisher. Robbie Gibbons, Allan Brown, Ovit Pursley. Eleventh row: Ty Cofield. Mike Rolison, .Amy Ashley, Heather Poor. Kim Bridges. Stephanie Waldrip. Marysha 
Tyler. Patrice Donnelly, Laura Whitney, Cindy Be'rger, Bev Pardue. Dara Trotter, Dennis Patenot'te, Joel Miller. Twelfth row: Andy Plemons. Ed Harris. Andy 
Winthrow. Charles McKie. Bo Shirey. Keith Jackson. Andrew Graham. Scott Milam. Chris Gillispie. 



40 •* Football 




Photographic Services 



•» Senior Linebacker Brisco Decembert takes out Auburn's Yarbrough 
as he tries to advance on an outside run. 



intercepted 
Wiggins' pass. 
Auburn drove for 
52 yards. At the 
end of the first 
quarter, Auburn 
led 10-0, and at 
the end of the 
half, 34-0. In the 
second half, 
Auburn's pro- 
duction fell to 162 
yards and 
Samford gained 
82 yards total 
offense. Auburn 
scored two sec- 
ond-half touch- 
downs on turn- 
overs from 
Samford. 

Quarterback 
Ben Wiggins said, 
"For us to win, we 
had to play a 
perfect game, 
and they had to 
make a lot of 
mistakes. But it 
turned out the 
other way 
around. I can't 
throw three 
interceptions 
against a good 
team in our class 
and expect to 
win. I certainly 
can't against a 
team like Au- 
burn." 

Despite the 
shutout that put 
Samford at 1-1, 
Samford will face 
the Tigers again 
next season. 

•* GAME III 

Samford de- 
fense dominated 
game three 
aginst Tennessee 
Tech in 
Cookeville. 
Samford recov- 
ered three 
fumbles and 
intercepted four 
Tennessee passes, 
which led to 27 of 
Samford's 37 



Athletics •* 41 



points in the 
game. Sopho- 
more Jeremy 
Perkins picked 
up two fumbles, 
and junior Eric 
Skipwith picked 
off two passes. 

Samford de- 
fense gave up 
only 164 yards 
and had eight 
tackles behind 
Tech's line of 
scrimmage. The 
defense held 
TTU's Willie 
Queens, the 
nation's seventh 
leading rusher, 
to 80 yards rush- 
ing. He had been 
averaging over 
150 yards per 
game. 

With set-ups 
from the special 
teams and de- 
fense, the Bull- 
dog offense 
opened up a 17-0 
lead by halftime. 
The Bulldog 
offense finished 
the game with 
307 yards. Senior 
Michael O'Neal 
kicked three field 
goals from 19, 32 
and 36 yards. He 
scored 12 points 
on the night, 
matching the 
second highest 
total in Samford 
history. With the 
37-13 victory, 
Samford ad- 
vanced to 2-1. 

•* GAME IV 

In Daytona 
Beach, Fla., the 
Bulldogs offense 
and defense had 
"hot" days. The 
offense gained 
358 yards, and a 
four-man defen- 
sive line helped 
the defense limit 
Bethune- 



Cookman to 13 
points. The four, 
Brisco Decembert, 
Eric Skipwith, 
Carlton Golden 
and Chad Mobley, 
added numbers to 
individual season 
statistics. 

Decembert, the 
only senior on 
defense, led with 
37 tackles. 
Skipwith made an 
interception, his 
second, and 
broke up five 
passes. Golden 
also had two 
interceptions 
after the fourth 
game, and 
Mobley led the 
team with three 
sacks. 

Offensively, 
Damian Hines 
stepped-up to 
replace Surkano 
Edwards who was 
out with a 
sprained ankle. 
Hines scored 
three times with 
a 4-yard run, 5- 
yard run and 23- 
yard reception. 
Hines finished in 
the third quarter 
with 105 yards. 
Quarterback Ben 
Wiggins com- 
pleted nine of 15 
passes for 119 
yards and two 
touchdowns. He 
also ran in a 1- 
yard TD in the 
second quarter. 

Held by 
Samford, the 
Wildcats scored 
only twice, once 
on a fumble by 
Marcus Durgin 
on a lateral punt 
return. Samford 
won again, 42-13. 

•^GAME V 

At home 
against Western 



Carolina, the 
Samford defense 
and the rain 
prevailed. In the 
first quarter 
freshman full- 
back Derek Staley 
scored a touch- 
down on a 5-yard 
run to end a 47- 
yard drive. 
Safety Carlton 
Golden set up the 
next score with 
an interception. 
Ben Wiggins 
followed through 
from the 1-yard 
line with a quar- 
terback sneak. 

In the second 
quarter Surkano 
Edwards scored 
on an 8-yard run. 
Michael O'Neal 
kicked the extra 
point bringing 
the score to 21-0. 
Western Carolina 
scored once in 
the second quar- 
ter with a 48- 
yard run. 



In the fourth 
quarter Samford 
scored again with 
a 21 -yard run 
from Lee Ellis. 
Quarterback Ben 
Wiggins finished 
the game with six 
completions and 
no interceptions. 
Head Coach Terry 
Bowden com- 
mented, "Ben 
Wiggins was 
exceptional . . . 
he graded almost 
100 percent." 

Samford 
brought its 
record to 4-1 with 
the 30-6 victory 
over Western 
Carolina. 

•> GAME VI 

In game six 
against the East- 
ern Kentucky 
Colonels, the 
Bulldogs "won all 
phases of the 
game," Coach 
Bowden said. 





K.T. Ha mil 



■Mud flies as Eric Skipworth hooks the West Georgia ballcarrier. 



42 •* Football 




•*■ Senior Lee Ellis stretches into the endzone for 6 of 44 points Samford scored 
against West Georgia. 



With 498 yards 
offensively, 
Samford scored 
nine times, twice 
in the first, 
second and third 
quarters and 
three times in 
the fourth. Quar- 
terback Ben 
Wiggins com- 
pleted 19 of 35 
passes for a 
career high of 
326 yards. The 
Bulldogs led 24-0 
at the half. 

Tank Edwards 
scored twice and 
finished the 
game with 76 
yards on 1 8 
carries. EKU 
scored in the 
third and fourth 
quarters on a 27- 
yard pass and a 3- 
yard run. The 
fourth quarter 
included a safety 
when the ball 
was snapped over 
the EKU 
quarterback's 
head. Samford 
stood at 5-1. 

•*GAME VII 

For homecom- 
ing, Samford 
racked up 611 
yards offen- 
sively, routing 
Southeast Mis- 
souri 45-14. Ben 
Wiggins com- 
pleted 20 of 37 
passes for 312 
yards as the 
offense gained 
247 yards rush- 
ing and 375 
passing. 

Defensively, 
Samford held the 
Indians to 224 
yards including 
two interceptions 
by Tory James 
and Carlton 
Golden. 

Michael O'Neal 



ATHLETICS** 43 



kicked off the 
first quarter with 
a field goal. 
Tight-end Bryan 
Fisher received 
five passes for 
1 15 yards, includ- 
ing a 20-yard TD 
reception in the 
first quarter. 
Tank Edwards 
kept running for 
158 yards, 21 
carries and three 
touchdowns. 

Wide-receiver 
Ron Green scored 
on a 47-yard 
reception in the 
third quarter and 
Damian Hines 
scored in the 
fourth quarter 
on a 5 -yard run. 
Samford won 45- 
14. 

Southeast 
Missouri coach 
John Mumford 
said, "Samford 
has a tremendous 
football team, one 
of the best in the 
country . . . they 
are very disci- 
plined." Game 
seven yielded a 6- 
1 record. 

•^ GAME VIII 

Samford liter- 
ally ran over 
UAB in a first 
time match-up 
between the two 
teams. Samford 
only scored once 
in the first quar- 
ter on a 3-yard 
run by Tank 
Edwards, but UAB 
followed with a 
quick field goal 
in the second 
quarter to trail 
only 7-3. But, 
they would score 
no more. 

After the UAB 
field goal with 
13:42 remaining 
in the half, 



Samford scored 
three touch- 
downs within 
four minutes. 
Lee Ellis scored 
from 26 yards out 
in a 71 -yard, 3- 
play drive. Then, 
noseguard Chad 
Mobley forced 
and recovered a 
fumble on a sack 
in the endzone. 
Three plays later, 
Marcus Durgin 
returned a punt 
64 yards for a 
touchdown. Five 
minutes later, 
Ellis scored again 
on a 4-yard run. 
Samford led at 
the half 35-3. 

In the third 
quarter, reserve 
fullback Allen 
Murphy scored 
on a 10-yard 
reception from 
quarterback Mel 
Hackbarth. 
Again in the 
fourth quarter, 
Samford scored 
when Brian May 
turned a short 
pass form 
Hackbarth into a 
41-yardTD. 

The Bulldogs 
more than 
doubled UAB's 
total yards, 466 to 
210, and for the 
third straight 
game, Samford 
gained at least 
450 yards and 
held the oppo- 
nent to under 
225. With the 
win over the 
Division III 
Blazers, 

Samford's record 
stood at 7-1. 

•C^GAME IX 

The Bulldogs 
broke a 6-game 
winning streak 
against Troy 



State. For the 
second year in a 
row, Samford 
rallied from 
behind, but this 
time the Trojans 
scored a fourth 
quarter TD. The 
Samford last 
minute effort fell 
a yard short on 
fourth and three 
at the TSU 20. 

Both teams 
entered the game 
with a 7-1 record. 
Before a 12,000 
plus hostile Troy 
State Homecom- 
ing crowd, 
Samford fell 
behind 17-0 after 
two turnovers in 
the first quarter. 

In the second 
quarter Carlton 
Golden recovered 
a fumble. Follow- 
ing the turnover, 
Tank Edwards ran 



•» Heading for an opening, Bryan 
Fisher carries a pass completion from 
quarterback Ben Wiggins. Fisher 
scored on a 36-yard reception in the 
West Georgia game. 

K.T. Harrell 





K.T. Harrell 



■» Escaping two blockers, Lee Ellis heads for the West 
Georgia end. 



44 •* Football 






^^^H ' 


• 


IF* 






'** 


r 




gM> — 


> 


1^4 fl 


^— ^ 



AM. Ha/rei/ 



•»#43 Bobby Emerson takes down an Eastern Kentucky running man. 

•»An Eastern Kentucky carrier holds on to the ball with both hands as 
Bulldog defendor Wyatt Hooks rams into him. 



in a 9-yard TD 
after a 13-play, 
67-yard drive. 
The defense then 
forced a punt and 
regained posses- 
sion of the ball 
with 3:03 remain- 
ing in the half. 
Quarterback Ben 
Wiggins hit 
Rodney Hawkins 
in the endzone 
with 1:01 remain- 
ing on the clock. 
Samford trailed 
14-7. 

Troy State 
answered with a 
99-yard kickoff 
return for a 
touchdown with 
45 seconds left in 
the half. Troy 
State missed the 
extra point, and 
led 23-14 at the 
half. 

Rallying in the 
third quarter, 
Samford scored 
on first posses- 
sion. Damian 
Hines caught a 
15 -yard pass 
from Wiggins to 
bring the score 
to 23-21 with the 
extra point. 
Momentum 
seemed to be 
shifting 
Samford's way 
when Tory James 
intercepted a TSU 
pass on the 30- 
yard line. James 
attempted to 
lateral the ball to 
Durgin, but the 
pass was knocked 
down. Troy State 
recovered on 
their own 23. 
The defense held, 
and Samford got 
the ball back and 
drove to the 
Trojan 28-yard 
line as time 
expired in the 
third quarter. 



Athletics •* 45 



The fourth 
quarter began 
with a 45-yard 
field goal by 
Michael O'Neal. 
For the first time 
in the game, 
Samford led 24- 
23. 

Troy scored 
again with a 76- 
yard march to 
the goal line. 
Samford blocked 
a field goal with 
two minutes left 
in the game and 
drove the ball to 
the Troy 40 be- 
fore turning it 
over on downs 
and ending the 
game 24-29. 

Coach Bowden 
said, "When 
people see the 
score they'll 
think it was the 
kind of game 
they expected it 
to be. But they'd 
never believe the 
way it hap- 
pened." 

Holding on to 
seven wins, 
Samford lost its 
second game. 

*C>GAME X 

The Bulldogs 
scored first 
against Tennes- 
see-Martin with 
Tank Edwards' 
47-yard run. 
However, UT- 
Martin scored on 
a 61-yard pass. 
Samford scored 
again on a 15- 
yard TD reception 
by Edwards, but 
the Pacers cut 
the score to 28-13 
at halftime with a 
2 5 -yard "Hail 
Mary" pass com- 
pleted as time ran 
out on the clock. 
UTM missed the 
extra point. 



In the third 
quarter Ron 
Green blocked a 
UT-Martin field 
goal attempt, and 
Edwards ran a 68- 
yard TD. UT- 
Martin answered 
with back to back 
touchdowns at 
the end of the 
third quarter and 
beginning of the 
fourth. 

Samford fin- 
ished the scoring 
when Bryan 
Fisher caught a 
9-yard pass from 
Wiggins. 
Michael O'Neal 
added the extra 
point, and 
Samford won 42- 
25, pushing the 
record to 8-2. 

•0-GAME XI 

At home for 
the last game of 
regular season 
play, Samford 
faced UCF in a 
must-win situa- 
tion to secure a 
second straight 
NCAA play-off 
bid. In the 
home-game 
rains, the Bull- 
dogs beat the 
Knights 20-13 in 
the fourteenth 
consecutive 
home-game 
victory. 

Leading 7-0 in 
the second quar- 
ter, Quarterback 
Ben Wiggins hit 
TeDarryl 
Marshall with 
the first of their 
two TD connec- 
tions. At the end 
of the second 
quarter, Ryan 
Perry inter- 
cepted to give 
Samford a 14-7 
lead. Again in 
the third quarter, 



"• With no pressure from the defense, 
quarterback Ben Wiggins became the 
second Bulldog quarterback to go over the 
5,000-yards passing mark against UCF. 




K.T. Il.irrell 



■* Darrell Murray executes a quarterback sack. Murray made 
six solo tackles against UCF, one for a loss. 



46 •* Football 




"• Eluding 
UAB, Ed Smith 
marches the 
ball downfield. 
Smith had a 4- 
yard TD run 
against UAB. 

Photo bvK.T. Harrell 








K. T. Harrell 



"• UCF defenders stand confused at the fake by #33 Tank Edwards and #12 Ron 
Green. 



Marshall scored 
on a 25-yard pass 
from Wiggins. 
Marshall caught 
the ball eight 
times for 115 
yards. 

The extra point 
attempt on the 
third quarter TD 
was blocked, so 
Samford entered 
the fourth quar- 
ter wih a 20-10 
lead. With five 
minutes left, 
UCF's Franco 
Grilla booted a 
46-yard field goal 
to end the scor- 
ing. Samford 
drove the ball to 
the UCF 7-yard 
line where they 
ran out the clock. 

Surkano 
Edwards moved 
into second place 
all-time in career 
rushing with 
2,094 yards for 
his career. In 
the game he 
carried the ball 
27 times for 140 
yards. Junior 
Rodney Hawkins 
carried the ball 
10 times for 62 
yards. The de- 
fense allowed UCF 
343 yards, hold- 
ing them to a 
season low in 
points. 

The Bulldogs 
finished out the 
season at 9-2 and 
headed for the 
play-offs. 

•^ GAME XII 

Ranked ninth 
in the NCAA poll, 
Samford took on 
the Yankee 
Conference co- 
champ, Delaware 
in Newark. The 
Bulldogs lost to 
the Blue Hens 56- 
21. 



ATHLETICS** 47 



The defense 
had difficulty 
stopping the 
Delaware "Wing 
T" offense. Every 
offensive play 
involved two 
takes and a hand- 
off. And, with 
the fast-moving 
backfield and 
pulling guards, 
Delaware fin- 
ished the day 
with 586 yards to 
Samford's282 
total yards. 

The Bulldogs 
trailed 28-7 at 
halftime. Marcus 
Durgin returned 
the opening 
kickoff 50 yards 
to start the third 



"A winning continu- 
ance" in memory of 
Charles D. Buford, #82 
defensive lineman. 



•> Tennessee- 
Martin, Tank 
Edwards earned his 
second national 
"Player of the 
Week" honor with 
312 yards, beating 
out Heisman Trophy 
candidate Marshall 
Faulk, who had 300 
yards. ESPN's 
Sportscenter 
recognized Edwards' 
school record and 
Division I season 
high. Edwards 
surpassed Brady 
[ones' single season 
rushing record as 
he be< ame the 
se< ond Bulldog to 
break the 1,000 
'. ard mark. He also 
tied the school 
■inl lour 
touchdowns in a 

: ed on a 

also 



quarter. Samford 
moved the ball 
down the field 44 
yards and 
brought the 
score to 28-14. 

Delaware 
immediately 
followed with a 
73-yard touch- 
down drive. The 
Blue Hens added 
three more 
touchdowns in 
the fourth quar- 
ter and Samford 
responded with 
one more. 
Samford finished 
post-season play 
quickly, with a 9- 
3 record for the 
year. 



•* Concentrating 
on the sidelines 
Michael O'Neal 
envisions the next 
play. Against 
Western Carolina 
O'Neal tied 
Samford's all-time 
scoring record at 
210 points. 
O'Neal broke the 
record in the 
third quarter 
with a 29-yard 
field goal. O'Neal 
set another school 
record against 
Eastern Kentucky 
for points in a 
game when he 
succeeded with 
field goals from 
31, 24, and 37 
yards and made 
all five extra 
points, totalling 
14. 




A.'. T. Harrell 







A Battling Stretch 



Making the play, first baseman Card Steele eases off the base 
as the runner is thrown out by a stride. 




Ruck Buchanan 



The baseball 
team faced a com- 
petitive schedule 
of 56 games, be- 
ginning February 
13, at Auburn. 
Samford lost to 
Auburn 5-1 and 
13-3. 

Senior Co-cap- 
tain Joe 

Hutchinson hit a 
single and drove 
in a run to tie the 
game on Saturday 
1-1. Auburn 
scored two runs in 
the next two in- 
nings to win. On 
Sunday, Samford 
led 2-6 in the 
fourth inning, but 
Auburn scored 



seven runs in 
one inning to 
secure a win. 
The Bulldogs 
only had five 
hits Saturday 
and six on Sun- 
day against 
Auburn pitchers 
who were throw- 
ing consistently 
in the upper 80- 
mph zone. 

After the loss 
to Auburn, the 
Bulldogs lost to 
SEC opponents 
Vanderbilt (8-5) 
and UAB, bring- 
ing the record to 
2-4. The two 
wins came from 
a Samford sweep 




Photographic Sen ices 



Row I: Ken Thornbrough, Jay Austin, Manse Waldrop, Corky Scarborough, Lee Gann, David White, Alan Verlander, 
Drew Lawrence, Joe Hutchinson, Jeff Gierhart, Jeff Sanders. Row 2: Coach Gerald Tuck, Trainer Andy Withrow, Brian 
Lucas, Paulie Allen, Charles Culp, John Mullen, Kent Marshall, Card Steele, Brett Hage, Trainer Bo Shirey, Coach Tommy 
Walker, Coach Dick Steed. Row 3: Derek Minacs, Tony Webster, Allan Abner, Wendell Magee, Russell Nolen, Michael 
Orr, Jeff Beard. 



ATHLETICS-* 49 



of the double- 
header against 
Tennessee State. 

Samford faced 
Sienna Heights 
February 24, and 
led 1 0-0 when the 
game was called 
because of dark- 
ness. 

February 26, 
Samford dropped a 
doubleheader 8-5 
and 7-1 to Tennes- 
see State and 
played Livingston 
University Febru- 
ary 28, and lost in 
the tenth inning 
by one run, 7-6. 
Although Samford 
had 1 1 hits to 
Livingston's 12, 
they could not 
manage to pull the 
win in the tenth. 
Fifteen men were 
stranded on base, 
seven in possible 
scoring position. 
One run in the 
fourth inning 
came from a 
homerun by Derek 
Minacs. 



# 5 Corky 
Scarborough bunts 
the ball and heads for 
:irst. 



For the first 
time in two years, 
Samford won a 
conference game 
against Mercer, 
Friday, March 5. 
Samford swept the 
three-game series 
to take an earlv 
lead in the TAAC 
Western Division 
rankings. 

The newest 
addition to the 



team, right fielder 
Wendell Magee, 
was hitting .458 
after the Bulldogs 
lost 10-2 to Bir- 
mingham South- 
ern, March 8. The 
Bulldogs outhit the 
Panthers 9-7. 

Magee attends 
Samford on a 
football scholar- 
ship, but said 
baseball could be 



his favorite. 

Samford lost its 
brief hold on first 
place in the TAAC 
when the Bulldogs 
fell to Centenary. 
Centenary scored 
27 runs in three 
games, sweeping 
the series. 
Samford stood at 7- 
13-1, 3-3 in the 
conference. 

In mid-March, 









The Bulldog first base runner makes a safe dive back to first after the throw escapes 
Alabama's lirst baseman. 



eball 



#34 Charles Gulp scoots back to first to 
beat the pitcher's attempt to catch him off 
base. 




X 


1 ' : % 


-« 




1 ■xfl 

1 



Ruck Bucli.m. ui 






#25 Tony Wevster dodges the throw home by the University 
of Alabama. 



Junior David White tosses a few to warm 
up before the game. 



ATHLETICS •» 5! 



Wendell Magee 

was hitting second 
in the TAAC and 
continued to lead 
the Bulldogs with a 
.432 batting aver- 
age, three home 
runs and eight 
RBIs. 

Infielder Derek 
Minacs (.362) and 
Senior Co-captain 
Lee Gann (.354) 
were also confer- 
ence leaders in 
batting. 

By mid-April, 
the Bulldogs 
headed into spring 
break with a 9-14- 
1 record, 4-5 in 
conference play. 
However, they lost 
three straight 
games at Mercer, 
dropping the 
conference record 
to 6-9 and the 
chance to guaran- 
tee a place in the 
TAAC tournament. 

In the last 15 
games, the Bull- 
dogs had nine 
conference games 
and faced several 
in-state teams like 
South Alabama, 
UAB and the Uni- 
versity of Ala- 
bama. 

Against the 
University of 
Alabama, the 
Bulldogs lost twice 
in Tuscaloosa, 6-4 
and 4-2. 

The Bulldogs 
finished the sea- 
son third in the 
Western Division 
with a 16-32-1 
record. Wendell 
Magee and Derek 
Minacs were 
named to the 
se< ond all-TAAC 
team. 

I had Coach 
Tommy Walker 
said the season was 
frustrating, but 
added, "We've 

iled all 
and I'm proud of 
fort." 

lanie Green 



#24 Derek 
Minacs advances the 
runner and heads for 
first as the Alabama 
infielders scramble 
to cover the play. 



Huddled around 
home plate, the 
bulldogs take time 
for a prayer of thanks 
after defeating 
Alabama. 




Buck Buchanan 




** Baseball 




Buck Buch.in.in 



First baseman 
Card Steele awaits the 
play to scoop up 
another Alabama out. 

#28 Grady York 

scores one as another 
Samford run rounds 
third and heads for 
home. 



"A Battling 
Stretch" in memory 
of Tim Kuehnert, 

outfielder. 






ATHLETICS** 53 



A Shooting Match 



On January 23, 
the Bulldogs beat 
Georgia State 92-78 
after losing to the 
Panthers in seven 
of eight previous 
games. 

Freshman guard 
Jonathan Pixley 
led the Bulldogs' 
scoring with 20 
points, a team 
high. On the road 
the 25th, the 
Bulldogs ousted the 
Centenary Lions 
from their tied 
third-place posi- 
tion with Samford 
in the conference. 

In the 60-57 
victory, Pixley 
again led the 
scoring with 18 
points. Samford 
shot 79 percent 
from the 



freethrow line and 
40 percent from 
the field. Senior 
guard David 
Herman provided 
defensive help 
with five steals. 

By February, the 
Bulldogs were on a 
tear after winning 
their last five 
consecutive 
games. With a 
record of 4-2 in 
conference play, 
they ranked third 
behind Mercer 
and top-seated 
Florida Interna- 
tional in the Trans 
America Athletic 
Conference. 

In the confron- 
tation with Mercer 
at Siebert Gym, 
February 6, the 
Bulldogs chalked 



up another win, 
89-71, over the 
Bears. The impact 
of the game cen- 
tered around 
concern for 
Jonathan Pixley, 
who had boosted 
the Bulldogs' 
conference record 
to 5-2. Pixley 
suffered a concus- 
sion when a de- 
fender cut his legs 
out from under 
him in a drive to 
the basket. Both 
teams huddled on 
the sidelines for 
prayer as medics 
attended to Pixley. 
Shortly after 

# 34 Bubba 
Sheafe lets it out as 
he goes up for two 
against Centenary. 




Photogrqaphic Senices 




Photographic 



Hart, Joey Davenport, David Herman, Kenya Franklin, David Truss, John Mantooth. Row 2: Brad 
:)landus Eason, DeWitt Matthews, Bubba Sheafe, Jodie Hays, Jonathan Pixley. 



•* Basketball 




Photographic Services 



Keeping his eye 
on the goal and his 
concentration on the 
point, David Truss 
pauses at the free 
throw line. 



#22 Olandus 

Eason lunges into a 
Relhaven defender to 
shoot for two form 
si ill defensive 
coverage. 



ATHLETI 



r '■: 



Pixley was taken 
from the gym to 
HealthSouth, play 
resumed and 
Mercer never 
attained a lead. 

Samford fell to 
two conference 
rivals on the road, 
February 1 1 and 
13. The" Bulldogs 
had defeated 
Stetson at home on 
January 14, but 
came up short in 
Deland, Florida, 76- 
57. In Miami, the 
No. 1 ranked 
Florida Interna- 
tional stopped the 
Bulldogs 58-47. 

TAAC statistics 
explained. 
Samford was 6-0 
when scoring 
more than 80 
points in a game 
and 0-3 in games 
scoring less than 
60. They ranked 
first in the con- 
ference in 3-point 
percentage and 
free-throw per- 
centage, second in 
scoring and sixth 
in rebounding. 

At 5-4, the Bull- 
dogs faced North- 
eastern Illinois, 
Tennessee-Martin 
and Georgia State. 
They stretched out 
a four-point lead 
in the final sec- 
onds to beat North- 
east Illinois. 
Bubba Sheafe 
scored 24 points 
with eight re- 
bounds. 

Against UT- 
Martin, the Bull- 
dogs pushed ahead 
early in the game 
and lead by 1 1 at 
hulttime. With a 
20-point-margin 

>r\, they 
avenged their loss 
by 20 points to UT- 
Martin in Decem- 
ber. 

ate, 

with 

ing s 



Freshman joey 
Davenport leaps up 
and shoots over the 
Iurman blocker. 



Under vigilant 
defensive coverage, 
#4 David Herman 
looks for a receiver 



Releasing the 
ball, #22 Olandus 
Eason finds a 
receiver for a 
downcourtshot. 




I'h< Hi >gr: iphic Sen ices 



Photographic Sen ices 



•* Ba 



.11 



Launching up 
against the opponent, 
#11 Kenya Franklin 
stretches to block the 
shot. 



From an on- 
court collision, #22 
Olandus Fason takes 
the brunt of the 
Furman player's fall. 



Intent on the 
goal, Freshman 
Jonathan Pixley 
pushes downcourt for 
two. 



Senior guard David 
Herman shot four 
for five from the 
three-point range, 
Pixley shot three 
for seven, Brad 
Smith shot two for 
four. Joey Daven- 
port grabbed the 
team-high with 
seven rebounds. 

At 6-4, the Bull- 
dogs squared off 
against Centenary 
and Souteastern 



Louisiana at home. 

Jonathan Pixley 
shot a three- 
pointer at the 
buzzer to give 
Samforda31-29 
edge at halftime. 
Pixley, along with 
Bubba Sheafe and 
Joey Davenport, 
combined for 34 of 
Samford's 58 win- 
ning points. 

Although out- 
side shooting had 




ATHLETICS-* 57 



Setting up an 
outside shot, #20 
Jonathan Pixley 
locates #24 Jarrod 
Jones. 

Racing through 
any block, #22 
Olandus Eason drives 
the ball toward the 
goal. 




Photographic Servi 



propels above the 
.mford's score. 




Photographic Ser\ices 



Basketball 







From the 
sidelines, Head Coach 
John Brady 
scrutinizes play as 
#11 Kenya Franklin 
and #12 David Truss 
observe the action, 
also. 



— - 


T~-~4— *^^ 


1 
1 ' 








J 


j a 


hHHHH .....»,._. ^ ' * ■- M,^v4 . • 1 ' 


1 l rl^ 





Photographic Jen ta is 



#20 Jonathan 
Pixle>' comes 
crashing down when 
a Mercer player cuts 
his legs from under 
him in a drive to the 
basket. 

In a layup for 
two more, #34 Bubba 
Sheafe animates the 
attempt as #10 Brad 
Smith and #1 1 Kenya 
Franklin anticipate 
the points. 



Photographic Sen ices 



ATHLETICS-* 59 



been the strength 
of the team thus 
far, Southeast 
Louisiana's outside 
shooting shut-out 
the Bulldogs 66-58 
and totaled 
Samford's TAAC 
record at 9-5. 

Samford fin- 
ished the season 
second in the 
TAAC. Florida 
Internatinal took 
first with a 19-10 
record and 
Samford fit into 
the second slot 
with a 17-10 sea- 
son tally. 

Senior forward 
Bubba Sheafe was 
named to the all- 
TAAC first team. 
The last year a 
Samford player 
had received this 
honor was 1984. 
Senior forward 
Brad Smith was 
named to the all- 
TAAC second team 



and freshmen 
Jonathan Pixley 
and Joey Daven- 
port racked up 
spots on the all- 
TAAC freshman 
team. Pixley 
placed second for 
the conference 
Newcomer of the 
Year Award. 

For the first 
time since 1986, 
the Bulldogs had a 
winning record in 
TAAC play and the 
third highest win 
total since Samford 
entered Division I 
play in 1972. Head 
Coach John Brady 
said the most 
significant thing 
about the year was 
that the team 
brought respect 
back to the pro- 
gram and estab- 
lished credibility 
within Samford's 
league. 

"Nobody thinks 



Samford is an easy 
win on their 
schedule any- 
more," he said. 

The final game 
was a bitter-sweet 
ending for five 
Samford seniors - 
Olandus Eason, 
DeWitt Matthews, 
Brad Smith, David 
Truss and Bubba 
Sheafe. 

"The five se- 
niors made the 
statement that 
Samford basketball 
is back and in 
pretty good shape. 
I'm proud they 
could experience 
this type of suc- 
cess. I had no 
disappointments 
with this team. 
They exceeded all 
of the expectations 
I had for them," 
Brady said in a 
Birmingham News 
article. 

Melanie Green 




Freshman Joey 
Davenport drives the 
ball downcourt intent 
on another basket. 



Spying the ball, 
#11 Kenya Franklin 
readies to stop the 
shot. 



[■mm 



tgrapt 




Bulldozing over Northeastern blockers, #11 Kenya 
anklin passes the ball above the pressure. 



Photographic Sen ices 



•» Basketball 




Samford and 
Furman men wait 
along the line for 
Senior David 
Herman's shot. 



Photographic Services 



Exploding amid 
Furman defenders, 
Joey Davenport 
pitches the ball to 
another Samford 
player. 




Photographic Services 



ATHLETICS** 61 



A Fiery Cheer 



The work habits 
and attitude of the 
Varsity 
cheerleading 
squad changed 
dramatically for 
the season. Senior 
co-captain Jenny 
Cherry said the 
year was different 
because "we had 
Coach Parks to 
push us so that we 
could accomplish 
our goals." Coach 
Brenda Parks 
sparked a greater 
interest in the 
cheerleading 
program and a 
talented Junior 
Varsity squad 
appeared. 

Much time, 
dedication and 
work went into the 
cheerleading 
effort with a 



season that began 
in August a week 
before the college 
campus camp and 
continued into the 
spring for basket- 
ball season. 

The Varsity 
cheerleaders 
continued to travel 
to each away game 
in support of the 
football team 
throughout the 
fall season and 
into the play-offs 
in December. 

Sophomore Eric 
Harris pointed out 
the importance of 
team unity to 
endure the length 
of the season. "It's 
a long season and 
without coopera- 
tion from every- 
body it gets even 
longer," he said. 

Melanie Green 




K.T. ILirrcIl 



Sammy drums up some spirit at a home 
basketball game. 




K.T. Harrell 



The Junior Varsity guys toss up Jenni Crumpton in a home game 
stunt exhibition. 



serleading 






Tonya Greene 
and Kelly Troll 
strike the motions 
while leading the 
crowd in a chant. 




Varsity and 
unior Varsity 
Cheerleaders rouse 
spirit at the Samford/ 
Auburn Pep Rally. 



K. 1. Il.im-ll 



ATHLETICS •» 63 



A Volleying Show 



The volleyball 
season opened in 
Richmond, Ken- 
tucky, at the 
Eastern Ken- 
tucky Invita- 
tional. The Lady 
Bulldogs beat 
Tennessee State 
University twice 
and lost to East- 
ern Kentucky 
and Tennessee 
Tech in close- 
margin games. 
This tournament 



was the first of 
five season tour- 
naments for the 
volleyball team. 
The team was 
young, with four 
new freshmen 
faces, but 
strengthened by a 
strong work ethic 
and dedicated 
returning team 
members. Coach 
Malinda Ashcraft 
said she liked this 
team and their 




competitive na- 
ture. "They have a 
strong work ethic 
and a strong in- 
tensity about 
them," she said. 
At the second 
tournament in 
Thibodaux, Louisi- 
ana, the young 
team was still 
learning to play 
together and 
coordinate win- 



ning on the court. 
The team lost three 
matches to 
Nicholls State, 
Southern Louisi- 
ana and the Uni- 
versity of Port- 
land, bringing the 
record to 4-6. 

The next tourna- 
ment action took 
place in Atlanta at 
the Georgia State 
Tournament 



where the Lady 
Bulldogs con- 
fronted confer- 
ence opponents, 
Stetson and Mer- 
cer. 

At Troy State the 
second weekend in 
October, Samford 
fell to Troy State in 
five games, then 
beat the Univer- 
sity of Alabama 
and lost to Georgia 



Senior Allison 
Morrow goes up for 
the overpass. 



Katie Sparks and 
Melissa Kanvoski 
pass the ball over to 
Jacksonville State 
defenders. 




olleyball 



State in another 
set of five games. 

The team 
dropped four more 
matches at the 
Tulane Invita- 
tional Tournament 
in New Orleans the 
third weekend in 
October. They lost 
three in-a-row to 
Tulane and Sam 
Houston, but 
brought the match 
to four games 
against Memphis 
State and Tennes- 
see Chattanooga. 
Despite a losing 
record of 11-17, 
Samford volleyball 



was 4-2 in confer- 
ence play and 
getting ready for 
the TAAC tourna- 
ment in Atlanta. 

About losing, 
junior Kacy 
Johnson said the 
team was strug- 
gling and "... 
couldn't seem to 
reach fifteen 
first." 

For the final 
home game of the 
season against 
Jacsonville State, 
the Bulldogs lost in 
a two-and-a-half- 
hour match 
against the Game- 



cocks. In three 
games of 10-15, 8- 
15 and 15-17, the 
offense encoun- 
tered scoring 
trouble and the 
defense had to 
deliver. Coach 
Ashcraft said that 
when playing in 
rigid matches, 
"you have to wait 
for the other team 
to make a mistake . 
. . and they had six 
experienced se- 
niors on the 
court." 

Back in Atlanta 
for the TAAC 
tournament in 



November, the 
volleyball team 
ended the season 
with a 14-22 
record. Samford 
lost to conference 
champion Central 
Florida in games of 
15-8,12-15,15-10, 
15-4, and then 
defeated Mercer 
15-6,15-11,15-13 
before losing to 
Georgia State in 
the third round, 
15-13,15-9,15-12. 

Freshman leader 
Melissa Karwoski 
led the team with 
14 kills against 
Georgia State and 




12 against Mercer. 
Karowowski fin- 
ished the season 
with a team high 
.266 attack per- 
centage. Team 
Captain Katie 
Sparks totaled with 



" When it's over, 
you realize how 
much you love 
the game. " 

-Pam Abernathy 



a .223 percentage. 
Katie also had the 
team high for 
serving aces with 
60. Freshman 
Donna Moak 
turned in 17 as- 
sists, 15 shy of 
1,000 for the sea- 
son. 

Both team se- 
niors, Pam 
Abernathy and 
Allison Morrow 
were named to the 
TAAC All-Academic 
three years. 
Abernathy said as 
the season and her 
collegiate volley- 
ball career ended, 
"When it's over 
you realize how 
much you loved 
the game." 

Eleven team 
players will re- 
turn next season 
with experience 
playing together 
and performing 
together. "It is 
time for us to move 
out of the middle 
of the pack," Coach 
Ashcraft said. 

Senior Pam 
Abernathy goes up 
against the opponent 
at the net and sDlaps 
the ball past the 
block. 



#8 Kyla Wells 
taps the ball just over 
the net to avoid 
Jack State block. 



K.T. Harreell 



K.T. Harrdl 



ATHLETICS** 65 




Brook Skinner 
and Melissa Karwoski 
line up in the air to 
block the pass from 
the opponent back 
court. 



K.T. Harrell 



66 •* Volleyball 




K.T. Harrell 



K.T. Harrell 



Katie Sparks 
rares back to send 
the ball flying back 
across the net. 



#6 Melissa 
Kanvoski sends the 
ball skimming across 
the net against thr 
two net defenders. 




K.T. Harrell 



ATHLETICS-* 67 



A Track Record 



Samford was one 
of eight teams 
competing March 
6, in the Albany 
(Georgia) State 
Relays as the 
outdoor season 
began. The 
women's team - 
Lisa Oliphant, 
Rachel Clift, 
Shellie Tillman 
and Anissa Smith - 
won the sprint- 
medley relay and 
broke the school 
record by three 
seconds, with a 
time of 1:52. They 
also ran the 800- 
meter relay and 
won with a time of 
1:47. 

The men's team 
swept the first five 
places in the 



5,000-meter run. 
Juan Gautier won 
with a time of 
15:36, followed by 
Sean Lyden, Scot 
McCosh, Robert 
Pautienus and 
John Phillips. 

Into April, 
Samford competed 
at the Emory 
Invitational in 
Atlanta. The 
women's team 
came in second 
behind Emory and 
the men's team 
unofficially fin- 
ished third. Se- 
nior Jeff Archer 
won both the 100- 
meter run and the 
200-meter run. 
Sophomore Sean 
Lyden marked up 
his first collegiate 



victory as he won 
the 1,500-meter 
run. Junior Scot 
McCosh won the 
3,000-meter 
steeplechase. 

The highlight of 
the meet was the 
women's 4x400- 
meter relay. The 
women had al- 



ready run against 
Emory twice, but 
this time, Rachel 
Clift, Jennifer 
Gardener, Diane 
Wuerslin and Lisa 
Oliphant beat 
Emory. 

When the track 
team competed at 
home in the 1993 



Samford Univer- 
sity Relays, they 
ran into several 
successes. 

The women 
broke school 
records in the 
4x400-meter relay 
and the triple 
jump. They fin- 
ished second 



Jennifer Garner stays neck to neck with the opponent as she 
clears the hurdle. 




Buck Buchanan 



With arms spread wide and legs clearing 
the hurdle with ease, Mike Stuart heads for 
the next obstacle in the hurdle race. 




Buck Buchanan 



Jeff Archer passes the baton to Craig Walker in the 4x400 relay. 



68 ^ Track 



overall behind 
Southeast Mis- 
souri. 

The men won 
the last two events, 
the 5,000-meter 



run and the 4x400- 
meter relay. Jun- 
ior Juan Gautier 
stayed even with a 
Southeast Missouri 
runner for 12 and 



1/2 laps of the 
5,000-meter run 
until he broke 
ahead in the last 
100 meters to win. 
Gautier won the 



Outstanding Indi- 
vidual Male Ath- 
lete Award for his 
performance. 

The men's 
4x400-meter relay 



I /-JC-* 



was tough compe- 
tition, but Michael 
Messer, Tim Shoup, 
Craig Walker and 
Jeff Archer fin- 
ished with a time 
of 3:18, the best of 
the year and the 
meet. The time 
was only two 
seconds away from 
the school record. 

The Samford 
track team con- 
sisted of 20 men 
and 18 women 
who, as a team, 
compiled a 3.0 
grade point aver- 
age. Coach Bill 
McClure com- 
mented that the 13 
scholarships 
distributed among 
the 38 runners 
kept competition 
tough not only on 
the field, but in 
the classroom as 
well. Melanie Green 




Buck Buchanan 



Buck Buchanan 



Jeff Archer takes off down the stretch 
in the baton relay. 



Rebecca Montgomery clears the pole in the high jump. 



ATHLETICS** 69 



A Running Experience 



The men and 
women's cross 
country teams 
rounded out a 
successful season 
in the fall by 
finishing fourth 
and fifth respec- 
tively in the 
Trans-America 
Athletic Confer- 
ence Champion- 
ship Meet in 
Deland, Florida, 
October 31. 

The men's team 
finished the sea- 
son with an over- 
all record of 52-26, 
and the women's 
team compiled a 



both teams shared 
was five top run- 
ners who com- 
peted and finished 
closely together 
during the meets. 
As a result, the top 
runners for each 
team encouraged 
dependence and 
unity within the 
team. Junior Juan 
Gautier and 
sophmore Sean 
Lyden were the 
lead runners for 
the men's team. 
Freshman Kelly 
Snow, sophomore 
Lisa Wells and 
senior Heather 



M 



I think running 

at Samford has made 
me a better runner and 
a better person." 

-Heather Hicks 



winning record of 
45-22. Both teams 
competed in meets 
throughout the 
Southeast. Coach 
Bill McClure said, 
"We improved 
from last year, 
with the experi- 
ence of our re- 
turning runners 
and the talent of 
our freshmen. We 
only have two 
seniors leaving 
from both teams, 
so we are looking 
forward to having 
most of our top 
runners back for 
next season. I 
think overall we 
had a good year." 
One strength 



Hicks were the 
lead runners for 
the women's team. 
Senior Heather 
Hicks said the 
product of this 
season came from 
working hard and 
having a good 
team. "I think 
running at 
Samford has made 
me a better run- 
ner and a better 
person. I'm glad to 
have been here 
for four years and 
given the chance, 
I'd do it all over 
again. I really 
think that most of 
our runners hold 
the same opinion," 

she said. 

Lisa Wells 



The women's cross country Juan Gautier leads the men's 

team takes off together in an early cross county team down the 
season run. competition trail. 



-:• -• 






Wfc'.f: 



Wr; 




r 

¥ 






Stuff 




Staff 



Cross Country 



Row 1: Diane Wuerslin, Heidi Beiersdoerfer, Lisa Wells, Heather Hicks, LuChrysta Sweet, 
Megan Kenney, Kelly Snow. Row 2: Tim Wood, Juan Gautier, Sean Lyden, John Phillips, Jason 
Preston. Row 3: Tim Shoup, Scot McCosh, Dan Hampton, Robert Pautienus, Donny Gooch. Row 4: 
Coach Bill McClure, Mike McClure. 




Staff 



Sean Lyden leads the pack in the cross country trek. 



Staff 



Senior Heather Hicks stays on line for 
the long run. 



ATHLETICS** 71 



A Big-Time Performance 



As determined 
by coaches and 
national polls, the 
Lady Bulldogs team 
had the best re- 
cruits in the 
Southeast as they 
began the fall 
scrimmage sched- 
ule. While getting 
ready for the 
spring season, the 
team went to 
Tallahassee, 
Florida, and almost 
defeated Florida 
State University's 
top-five ranked 
team. In the 3-2 
loss, they had 
given up no runs, 
but had begun to 
challenge Division 
I opponents. 

The second 
weekend in Febru- 
ary the Lady 
Bulldogs faced FSU 
again in Tallahas- 
see for a double 
header. They held 



the Seminoles to a 
1-1 tie until the 
fifth inning when 
two errors cost 
Samford the game. 
In the second 
game, Samford lost 
8-4. 

Sophomore 
Holly Tucker 
pitched in three of 
four games 
throughout the 
weekend. They 
took on Troy State 
the same weekend 
in another double- 
header in which 
they split the 
outcome 5-4 and 
6-4. 

Samford took on 
other big-name 
schools such as 
DePaul, Georgia 
Tech, Michigan 
State, Notre Dame, 
Oklahoma State, 
Texas A&M and 
Virginia. 

In March, the 



Bulldogs went into 
an extra-inning 
against Georgia 
Tech to pull out a 
4-3 victory. 
Throughout the 
weekend of the 
1993 Louisiana 
Classics Softball 



Tournament, the 
ladies went 1-3, 
lowering the 
overall record to 
2-6. Despite the 
losses, freshman 
Amanda Woolf was 
five for 15 at bats 
and was named to 



the all-tourna- 
ment team. In the 
extra-inning 
game, the Bulldogs 
showed their 
fighting spirit as 
they rallied and 
scored three runs 
in the eighth, 



Pitcher Angie Dickinson sends one to the plate as first baseman 
Kim Oelschlager waits for the swing. 




Buck Buchanan 



Rounding third, Megan Capehart heads for home to add one more to the Bulldogs' score. 



72 •♦ Softball 



f f If they come out to see us 
play once, they'll want to 
come back again." 

-Head Coach Jim Nolen 




Buck Buchanan 




Buck Buchanan 



pushing the game 
into extra innings. 
Senior Kim 
Oelschlager drove 
in the winning 
run with a single 
in the ninth. 

For two weeks in 
mid-April, the 
softball Bulldogs 
won eight of 14 
outings on the 
field. They ranked 
third and Fresh- 



Carolina 8-1. 
Davidson ranked 
third in the con- 
ference for ERAs 
and Woolf led the 
conference in 
triples and was 
third for RBIs per 
game. They 
ranked third in 
the conference at 
a 13-18 mark. 
Stetson was second 
and Georgia State 



Senior Kim Oelschlager and Connie 
Waters laugh among team members during 
pre-game time. Kim drove in the winning run 
in extra innings in the Louisiana Classics 
Softball Tournament. 

Following through with a full swing, 
Connie Waters knocks the ball down the 
third-base line. 




Short stop Amanda Woolf stretches up to make an easy infield 
catch as #9 Connie Waters looks for the out. On the offense, Woolf led 
the conference in triples during the season. 



man Amanda 
Woolf was named 
TAAC player of the 
week. Angie 
Dickinson was also 
named TAAC 
pitcher of the 
week. During the 
Frost Cutlery 
Tournament in 
Chattanooga, 
Tennessee, the 
ladies beat South 



Buck Buchanan 

held the top slot. 

Head Coach Jim 
Nolen commented 
that most people 
are not aware of 
the calibre of 
Samford's Softball 
team. 

"If they come 
out to see us play 
once, they'll want 
to come back 
again," he said. 

Melanie Green 



ATHLETICS-* 73 



A Swinging Set 



Early in the Fall, 
senior standouts 
appeared in tour- 
nament play. 
Donovan Septem- 
ber defeated 24th 
ranked Mayar 
Goodraz of Ken- 
tucky (6-2, 6-2) in 
the third round of 
the Volvo Colle- 
giate Champion- 
ships. In the 
Southern Intercol- 
legiate Tourna- 
ment the first 
week in October, 
freshman Allen 
Dickson pro- 
gressed to the 
quarter-final 
round before 
losing to Damon 
Henkel of Florida 
(6-3, 4-6, 7-6). 

Also entering 
the fall season, the 
women's team 
ranked 12th in the 
South Region by 
preseason polls. 
Senior Brittany 
Haley reached the 
semi-final round 
before losing to 
Amanda 
Mitropoulon of 
South Alabama (6- 
1, 4-6, 6-4). In the 
same tournament, 
senior Chandra 
Howard and Haley 
defeated fourth- 
seated Anna 
Larsheim and 
Zuzana Witsova in 
the semi-final 
round of doubles 
(6-1,4-6, 7-5). 
They did not play 
in the final round 
due to inclement 
weather. 

At the Charlie 
Owens Open, the 
Bulldogs wrapped 
up the fall home 
schedule, as five of 
seven Samford 
men advanced 



from the first 
round of play. 
Donovan Septem- 
ber played 
through each of 
his opponents in 
straight sets (6-1, 
6-2; 6-1, 6-1; 6-3,7- 
5). September lost 
to Hermansson in 
the final round (6- 
7,6-3,7-5). 

Five Samford 
women played in 
the tournament. 
Ann Armistead, 
Rebecca Treadwell 
and Jennie Wise 
advanced to the 
second round and 
Wise advanced to 
the third round 
winning two 
matches, but 
losing 6-3, 3-6, 6-2, 
to Liz Foster of 
Birmingham 
Southern. 

Senior Jesselyn 
Reed teamed up 
with a UAB player 
to win the mixed 
doubles competi- 
tion in the tour- 
ney. The same 
weekend, Brittany 
Haley and Chandra 
Howard competed 
in the Rolex 
Southern Regional 
Championships in 
Tuscaloosa. 

As spring play 
emerged, the 
women's team 
faced last year's 
conference cham- 
pions, Florida 
International 
University. With 
one loss to Auburn 
on the record, the 
team struggled 
through several 
close matches 
before losing 7-2. 
Head Coach Pat 
Breen said, "Our 
seniors know what 
it takes to win and 




Photographic Senices 



Row 1: Marcel Olivares, Jarrod Randle, Brittany Haley , Akash 
Lambda, Amy Scotch, Aaron Campos, Coach Pat Breen. Row Two: 
Marcel Janecka, Chandra Howard, Jenny Wise, Jill Wise, Ann 
Armistead, Hugh Quinn. Row 3: Jesselyn Reed, Rebecca Treadwell. 
Row 4: Stuart Hill, Allen Dickson. 



did not like the 
taste of finishing 
second last year. I 
think their leader- 
ship is going a 
long way this 
season." 

The second 
weekend in Febru- 
ary, the men's 



team pulled out a 
decisive victory. 
They beat the 
University of 
Tennessee Chatta- 
nooga, 5-2. Win- 
ners were 
Donovan Septem- 
ber, freshmen 
Stuart Hill and 



Akash Lambda, 
and sophomore 
Marcel Janecka. 

After losing two 
matches at 
Samford February 
26, the men's 
record dropped to 
2-5 for the season. 
The men played 



74 ^Tennis 



against Mobile 
College. Singles 
winners included 
Donovan Septem- 
ber, Akash Lambda 
and junior Aaron 
Campos. Lambda, a 
freshman from 
New Delhi, India, 
took over the 
number two spot 



on the men's 
seeding when 
freshman Allen 
Dickson was side- 
lined with a 
sprained ankle 
against Tennessee 
Chattanooga. 

On the 27th, 
Donovan Septem- 
ber won the only 



victory for the 
Bulldogs when he 
ousted Jan 
Hermansson 6-1 in 
the third set of the 
match. 

Into April, 
senior Donovan 
September stood 
out as the best 
player in the 




i 



TransAmerica 
Athletic Confer- 
ence when 
Samford travelled 
to the TAAC tour- 
nament in Deland, 
Florida. 

The men's team 
beat College of 
Charleston, 5-2, 
and Southeast 
Louisiana, 5-1, 
before losing to 
conference cham- 
pion Florida Inter- 
national in the 
semifinal round. 
Akash Lambda was 
also named to the 
all-conference 
team. 

The women's 
team finished 
second in the TAAC 
conference for the 
year. They placed 
second after bat- 
tling Southeast 
Louisiana State in 
the final round. 
Samford beat the 
University of 
Central Florida 



first, 8-1, and then 
swept UCF in 
doubles play. 

In the second 
round, Samford 
faced Rollins 
College and won 5- 
4. In the finals, 
the women battled 
it out with South- 
east Louisiana, 
losing by one, 5-4. 

Finishing sec- 
ond for the second 
year in a row, the 
team showed 
leadership and 
endurance. "... 
the key was team," 
senior Chandra 
Howard said. 
Howard and Brit- 
tany Haley were 
named to the All- 
TAAC team. 

Not only did the 
tennis teams excel, 
but so did Head 
Coach Pat Breen. 
He was named 
Coach of the Year 
at the TAAC Con- 
ference in April. 

Melanie Green 




Photographic Senices 



Raring back from above the court 
surface, Jesselyn Reed knocks the ball flying 
into the opponent court. 

Jennifer Wise draws back for a return 
pass across the net. 

Senior Chandra Howard stretches to 
return the shot. 



Photographic Services 



ATHLETICS-* 75 



A Golfing Round 



The first week- 
end in March, 
junior golfer 
Myles Averns tied 
for third place in 
the All-tourna- 
ment team at the 
Wynlakes Wynter 
National in Mont- 
gomery. 

He led the team 
with a first round 
score of 69, one 
shot behind Neil 
Thompson, an- 
other Enlish golfer 
form Central 
Alabama Commu- 
nity College. 
Averns completed 
the 36-hole outing 
by shooting 74 for 
a total score of 143. 
The last day of the 
tournament was 
canceled due to 
rain. Averns said 
his game of 1 1 
birdies over the 
first 22 holes 
seemed easy. 

Senior Ian 
Thompson finished 
second on 
Samford's team, 
shooting 77 and 76. 
Samford finished 
eleventh out of 16 
schools competing. 
The field included 
four of the top six 
junior colleges in 
the nation and was 
the second stron- 
gest field Samford 
faced in the sea- 
son. 

The women's 
golf team played in 
two of three events 
during spring 
break and the men 
took on two tour- 
naments in early 
April. Samford 
placed ninth out of 
17 teams, two 
strokes behind 
UAB, with a total of 
676 at Western 



The Men's Team 

Myles Averns 

Wayne Cancienne 

Jason DAmbra 

Shannon Featherman 

Davidjoyner 

TonyRuggiero 

Ian Thompson 

Coach Lee Manley 



Kentucky's tour- 
nament in Bowl- 
ing Green, Ken- 
tucky. 

Judith Saies shot 
84 and 80 to finish 
in the top 15 and 
Kelsey Logan 
finished second on 
the team with a 
two-round total of 
167. 

Samford's 
women golfers 
were eighth out of 
14 teams in the 
Arkansas State 
Tournament. 
Michelle Shelton 
placed thirteenth 
overall at 85 and 
82, Samford's best 
score. Sarah Saies 
came in second for 
the team with a 
two-round score of 
174. 

The men's team 
was sixth of the 1 5 
teams at the 
Derrall Foreman 
Invitational 
spnsored by Delta 
State University in 
Cleveland, Missis- 
sippi, March 18- 
20. Ian Thompson 
finished one 



stroke off the lead 
of 146 by Missis- 
sippi State's Richie 
Taylor. Thompson 
won all-tourna- 
ment honors and 
Myles Averns shot 
153 for second 
place. 

Samford hosted a 
tournament at 
Heatherwood 
Country Club and 
trailed only by 
four shots in 
taking second 
place. Again 
leading the Bull- 
dogs, Ian Thomp- 
son shot 71 and 77 
and gained sev- 
enth place overall. 
Jason D'Ambra (78, 
73) and Tony 
Ruggiero (75-76) 
were second for 
Samford and elev- 
enth overall with 
a total score of 151. 

After the last 
round at UAB/Bent 
Brook April 15, the 
men's team placed 
eighth of nine 
teams competing 
in the TAAC tour- 
nament hosted by 
Mercer. 

Melanie Green 



Senior Ian 
Thompson watches to 
see the results of his 
shot at the Bent Brook 
Blazer Invitational. 



r * \ 









76 •frGolf 





1. J 







- TV 



H 



A 



\ - pgf 



Staff 



Ian Thompson 
approaches the hole 
at Bent Brook to 
recover his ball after 
a successful shot. 



. i n _. ■ i 



Photographic Senices 



Judith Saies, Kristen Schwinghammer, Kelsey Logan, Coach 
Jamelle Shaw, Michelle Shelton, Stefanie Robinson, Sarah Saies. 




ATHLETICS** 77 





OF INTIATION 



Alpha Delta Pi 



80-81 



Chi Omega 



82-83 



Delta Zeta 



84-85 



Phi Mu 



86-87 



Zeta Tan Alpha 




88-89 



Lambda Chi Alpha 



90-91 



Sigma Chi 



92-93 



J 



Pi Kappa Alpha 



94-95 



Sigma Nu 



96-97 



Pi Kappa Phi 



98-99 



Phi Mu Alpha/Delta Omicron 100-101 

Alpha Phi Omega/Gamma Sigma 
Sigma 102-103 



A Cappella Choir/SGA 



104-105 




Theater 



106-107 



Band 



Entre Nous/Angel Flight 



108-110 
111 



78 •* Division 




■* The cast looks 
on as Leon tries to 
break the curse of 
Kulyenchikov in the 
student production of 
Fools. 



ORGANIZATIONS/GREEKS-* 79 




80 •* Alpha Delta Pi 




Chapter Facts 



Kappa Chapter 

Founded in 

1851 at the 

Wesleyan 

College 

Macon, Georgia 

Colors: 

Azure blue and 

White 

Philanthropy: 

Ronald 

McDonald House 



AAn 




ALPHA 

DELTA 

PI 



The year 1992-1993 was one of 
diversity for the Kappa chapter of 
Alpha Delta Pi. During the fall the 
chapter sponsered the first annual 
All-Sports Mixer. Other parties in- 
cluded the Lawn Party, Cowboy Coun- 
try, and the Winter Formal. The 
spring held the Mardi Gras semi- 
formal and a baseball party at the 
Birmingham Barons' opening game. 

For service events the sisters 
planned a walk-a-thon to raise money 
for the Ronald McDonald House. 
Approximatley $3500 was given to 
the House, as well as Easter baskets 
for the children living there. 

On the national level Kappa 
chapter was chosen to sponsor the 
1993 phon-a-thon which raised 
money for the Alpha Delta Pi Founda- 
tion. The sisters helped raise over 
$45,000 in four days. 

The Kappa chapter has once again 
had a year full of activities both 
service and social, all of which have 
helped shape the sisters of Alpha 

Delta Pi. . 

Bonnie Siler 



Reene Hyland, Amy Aikes, Lisa Hol- 
comb, Lee Ann Woosley, and Melanie Eagar 
gather at the Chi Omega house on Squeal Day. 

Alpha Delta Pi 



Sisters gather in their Pi Rock t-shirts 
as they prepare for a rush skit. 

Alpha Delta Pi 



Some of the seniors gather to think about 
their years as sisters and the years to come, 
but mainly they are out to have a good time. 

Alpha Delta Pi 



Organizations/Greeks ^81 




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82 •* Chi Omega 




Chapter Facts 

Zeta Zeta 
Chapter 

Founded in 
1895 at the 
University of 
Arkansas at 
Fayetteville 

Colors: 

Cardinal and 

Straw 

Philanthropy: 
King's Ranch 



XQ. 




CHI 
OMEGA 



The sisters of Chi Omega began 
an excititng year, pledging in 43 new 
girls, and were on their way to finding 
out what Chi Omega was all about. 
The Chi-0 Crush was held at Sloss 
Furnace and the Winter Formal at the 
Harbert Center. The sisters also par- 
ticipated in the Festival of Trees and 
the Birmingham Jam. 

The spring semester brought 
Step Sing once again. The Sunshine 
theme brought the sisters a third 
place finish in the women's divison. 
The semi-formal was held at the 
Donnely House as the sisters and 
their dates enjoyed a break from 
school. As the special Olympics came 
to Samford, the sisters took this op- 
portunity to give some of themselves 
to help some very special children. 

Nationally, the Zeta Zeta chap- 
ter won two awards, the Award of 
Achievement and the Grade Point 
Average Award. 

Jen Thorn 



Chi Omega's show their spirit at the Pi 
Kappa Phi Star and Lamp Formal. 

Chi Omega 

Emily Parker, Kimberly Cox, Marti 
Hancock, and Lisa Kruse take time out from 
the party to pose for a quick shot. 

Chi Omega 

The sisters gather for a group picture at 
the Chi Omega semi-formal. 

Chi Omega 



ORGANIZATIONS/GREEKS •* 83 




84 •* Delta Zeta 




Chapter Facts 



Alpha Pi 
Chapter 

Founded in 
1902 at Miami 

University 
Oxford, Ohio 

Colors: 
Rose and Green 

Philanthropy: 

Speech and 

Hearing 

Impaired 



AZ 




DELTA 
ZETA 



Sisterhood came to mean some- 
thing special to the ladies of Delta 
Zeta this year. Though the year be- 
gan with a struggle, Alpha Pi chapter 
came through to end the year with a 
bang. 

In the fall the sisters partied 
beginning with the pledge bash at 
Pickwick Plaza. Other social events 
included the Founder's Day party and 
Winter Formal. Of course, the sisters 
participated in service events as well. 
From painting faces at the Fall Carni- 
val to decorating a Christmas tree for 
the Festival of Trees, sisters valued 
service as much as socializing. 

The spring semester brought the 
annual Step Sing rush. This year the 
ladies of Delta Zeta combined with the 
ladies of Delta Omicron to take every 
one back in time through television 
re-runs. Alpha Pi was recognized 
throughout hte province this year, 
and received several awards including 
the Huntsville Alumna Award, the 
highest award in the provience for 
philanthropy. 

Closing out the year the sisters 
enjoyed three rush workshops to help 
plan for the fall, the Rose Cotillion 
semi-formal, and the annual Tahiti 
Sweetie. Delta Zeta also raised money 
for their national philanthropy by 
holding a 24-hour See-Saw-A-Thon in 
April. Tiffanv Townsend 



Cheri Stites and Shayne Jackson take 
time out before they hit the town. 

Delta Zeta 

The ladies of Delta Zeta join with the 
ladies of Delta Omicron for a trip to Gilligan's 
Island. 

Delta Zeta 

The ladies of Delta Zeta get a group shot 
at the Winter Formal. 

Delta Zeta 



ORGANIZATIONS/GREEKS •* 85 






$>!(^!(^; 



,<S|I (&'< O 1 O 1 O 1 



#*>< 



86 •* Phi Mu 





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fU^^r 1 a 






k 


W~- ^^^^JRl 




bT' 


'^■\^riV' ' n 






.j*h 


V 



Chapter Facts 



Alpha Gamma 
Chapter 

Founded in 

1852 at the 

Wesleyan 

College 

Macon, Georgia 

Colors: 
Rose and White 

Philanthropy: 

Children's 

Hospital 



OM 



V 




PHIMU 



"To encourage its members to 
strive for the noblest, purest, and 
highest ideals and aspirations of 
womanhood, developing these ideals 
in a spirit of service, helpfulness, and 
cooperation, along with mental and 
intellectual development."- the first 
purpose. The sisters of Phi Mu strive 
to uphold this and the other purposes 
to develop the bonds of sisterhood. 

In the fall, the Alpha Gamma 
chapter held the Pledge Bash, Mystery 
Masquerade, and the Winter Formal. 
In addition to the parties, they had a 
fundraiser for the Children's Hospital, 
as well as supporting other activities 
on campus and in the community. 

The spring brought Step Sing 
and the annual Rock-a-thon for the 
Children's Hospital, along with several 
more parties and the semi-formal. 
The sisters enjoyed coming together 
to work and play and realizing the 
responsiblity of being a Phi Mu. 

Lynn Hogevvood 



Allison Yeager, Beth Guest, Christine 
Martin, Melissa Levvellen and Angela McManus 
go out to eat as part of Squeal Day activities. 

Phi Mu 



Melanie Russell, Tammy Bell, Kristy 
Verchot, Lisa McGehee and Lesley Hall enjoy 
themselves at a Sigma Nu rush party. 

Phi Mu 



During the sisterhood retreat at Twin 
Pines Conference Center, the sisters took time 
to relax and plan for the coming year. 

Phi Mu 



ORGANIZATIONS/GREEKS •* 87 


















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88 •* Zeta Tau Alpha 




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Chapter Facts 

Delta Psi 
Chapter 

Founded in 

1898 at the 

Longwood 

College 

Farmville, 

Virginia 

Colors: 
Gray and Blue 

Philanthropy: 

Assoc, for 

Retarded 

Citizens 

ZTA 




ZETA 

TAU 

ALPHA 



The ladies of Zeta Tau Alpha 
began an exciting year by pledging 43 
wonderful girls. On Squeal Day, the 
sisters welcomed their new pledges 
with a celebration at Oak Mountain 
State Park. They held the Golf Classic 
at the Highland Golf Course, their 
annual sweatshirt party at Twin Pines, 
and their semi-formal at the Harbert 
Center. The sisters also took part of 
the Susan G. Komen, Race for the 
Cure, which raised money for the 
Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. 

The spring semester began with 
the Draft-a-Date party and then the 
White Violet Formal, which was at The 
Pillars. They also participated in 
Hunger Clean-up and held their sec- 
ond annual Hoopfest, also to raise 
money for the Komen Breast Cancer 
Foundation. The Greek awards cer- 
emony was a highlight to wrap-up the 
year for the Zeta's as they received 
the Chapter Proficiency and the 
Panhellenic All-Sports trophy. 

Dana McCants 



Taking a break from the action, Shannon 
Summers and April Carter are all smiles. 

Zeta. Tau Alpha 



Zeta's get caught at Birmingham Southern 
during a "Black Out Mixer" with the brothers 
of the Kappa Alpha Order. 

Zeta Tau Alpha 



Squeal Day 1992 offers fun and 
anticipation for everyone as the new year gets 
underway. 

Zeta Tau Alpha 



ORGANIZATIONS/GREEKS •* 89 






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90 •* Lambda Chi Alpha 




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Chapter Facts 



Theta Alpha 
Chapter 

Founded in 

1911 in Boston, 

Massachusetts 

Colors: 

Purple, Gold 

and Green 

Philanthropy: 
Big Brothers 



AXA 




LAMBDA 

CHI 

ALPHA 



Lambda Chi Alpha, "the frater- 
nity of honest friendship," has en- 
joyed another great year of brother- 
hood. During fall rush the ever popu- 
lar Toga and Caveman parties were a 
hit as usual. Rush was a huge sucess 
producing 39 associates, giving the 
brothers the largest associate class in 
its history. 

With this large addition to the 
brotherhood, involvement in campus 
activities such as Step Sing, A 
Cappella Choir, Campus Ministries, 
varsity sports, and many others in- 
creased. By spring semester, they had 
shown their ability to work together, 
by building a sand volleyball court 
behind their house and making many 
improvements to the interior. 

The year ended with the same 
excitement with which it began. The 
Cresent Formal in Panama City of- 
fered an escape from the stressful end 
of the semester. Through the growth 
of the brotherhood and its achieve- 
ments, one can not help but see great 
hope and promise for the future of 
Lambda Chi Alpha. 

Lee Johnson 



The brothers of Lambda Chi Alpha 
celebrate their victory, making them IFC 
Basketball Champion for 1993. 

Lambda Chi .Alpha 



Brothers and rushees gather for a 
serious shot during the rush "Pref" Party. 

Lambda Chi .Alpha 



Enjoying a break from school, the 
Lambda Chi's take the beach by storm during 
their spring formal. 

Lambda Chi .Alpha 



ORGANIZATIONS/GREEKS •* 91 






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92 •* Sigma Chi 




Chapter Facts 



Pi Chapter 

Founded in 
1855 at Miami 

University 
Oxford, Ohio 

Colors: 
Blue and gold 

Philanthropy: 

George Wallace 

Village for 

Children 




^. 




SIGMA 
CHI 



Striving for excellence through 
brotherhood, the brothers of Sigma 
Chi were proud to finish a year filled 
with many great accomplishments. 
Among the honors they received were 
Highest Pledge Class GPA and Highest 
Fraternity GPA. In athletics they were 
also victorious, claiming the Inter- 
Fraternity Council championships in 
football, volley ball, and softball as 
well as the All Sports Championship 
trophy. 

The brothers of Sigma Chi could 
be found in almost every portion of 
Samford life. Several brothers were 
members of the Student Government 
Association and the Senate. Such 
diversity within the brotherhood 
proved to be beneficial in building a 
stronger fraternity. Such extensive 
involvement throughout the campus 
has built a reputation for excellence 
through service and dedication. 

Service was a another aspect of 
the brotherhood this year. They 
helped with Camp Smile-A-Mile, a 
camp for children with cancer, 
throughout the year and picked them 
up and brought them to several 
Samford football games. 

All of these things have played a 
part of building a very strong brother- 
hood at Samford, proving that only 
through hard work and dedication 
can anything of true value be gained. 

Jason McGehee 



The brothers show their spirit during 
StepSing. 

Sigma Chi 

Richard Lawson, David Mahanes, Scott 
Lundy and Vince Strawbridge show true style 
at the fall semi-formal. 

Sigma Chi 

Bid Day proves to be a day of pride and 
high expectations for all. 

Sigma Chi 



ORGANIZATIONS/GREEKS •* 93 




















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94 •* Pi Kappa Alpha 




Chapter Facts 

Alpha Pi 
Chapter 

Founded in 

1868 at the 

University of 

Virginia at 
Charlottesville 

Colors: 
Garnet and 
Gold 

Philanthropy: 
King's Ranch 



nKA 




PI 

KAPPA 
ALPHA 



Pi Kappa Alpha had a great '92- 
'93 year. During their 82nd year on 
campus, the brothers concentrated on 
becoming the best they could, both 
individually and as a fraternity. The 
chapter hosted the Dixie regional 
conference for all the Pi Kappa Alpha 
chapters in Alabama and Georgia. 
They participated in the Adopt-a-Mile 
Program, Habitat for Humanity, Hard 
Elementary partnership, and received 
a national award for Campus Involve- 
ment. 

Rush brought the "Winnebago 
Road Trip" to the Auburn/Samford 
football game and the traditional 
Woodstock party. The brothers also 
enjoyed the Christmas Formal at Baby 
Does and the Spring Formal at Fort 
Walton Beach. 

Although the calendar year was 
full, the brothers still made time for 
Southside, playing football, and cook- 
ing out at the house. These events 
allowed the men to come together 
and enjoy the privilege of being a 
brother in Pi Kappa Alpha. Building 
brotherhood was very important and 
strengthening that bond continued to 
make Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity 
"unique to the Samford community." 

Matt Browning 

Starting the year off in a wild and crazy 
fashion, the brothers and future pledges 
celebrate Bid Day. 

Pi Kappa Alpha 



Brothers take a break from the Chi 
Omega Semi-Formal and take time to be cool 
for the camera. 

Pi Kappa Alpha 

Decked out in tuxedos, Pikes show their 
true style at a party. 

Pi Kappa Alpha 



ORGANIZATIONS/GREEKS •* 95 




96 •* Sigma Nu 




Chapter Facts 

Iota Chapter 

Founded in 

1869 at 

Virginia 

Military 

Institute 

Lexington, 
Virginia 

Colors: 
Black and Gold 

Philanthropy: 

American 
Cancer Society 



SN 




SIGMA 

NU 



Adhering to their founding 
principals of honor, truth, and love, 
the members of Sigma Nu, led by 
their "illustrious" commander, contin- 
ued a 114-year tradition of building 
excellence. 

Once again the Iota Chapter 
excelled in intramural sports, with 
impressive finishes in football, basket- 
ball and soccer. 

At least one member could be 
found in almost every social organiza- 
tion on campus. SGA, FCA, student 
recruitment teams, BSU and many 
others were among those including 
brothers. As they continue building 
on their traditions of honor, truth, 
and love, the men of Sigma Nu 
pledged to be a vital part of the fu- 
ture of Samford University. 

Derek R. Waltchach 



At a favorite restaurant, Joel Gilbert, 
Andy Beck, Brian Lucas, Gordon Shields, Ron 
Beasley and their dates pose for a group shot. 

Sigma Nu 



The brothers and rushees eagerly 
anticipate Bid Day. 

Sigma Nu 



Spme of the brothers take a rest from the 
action at the Zeta Tau Alpha, White Rose 
Formal. 

Sigma Nu 



ORGANIZATIONS/GREEKS •* 97 





1^1 .y 




98 •* Pi Kappa Phi 



_ 




Chapter Facts 

Alpha Eta 
Chapter 

Founded in 

1904 at the 

College of 

Charleston in 
Charleston, 

South Carolina 

Colors: 
Gold and White 

Philanthropy: 
Push America 



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KAPPA 
PHI 



As rush began in the fall, the 
brothers of Pi Kappa Phi were on their 
way to a great year of brotherhood. 
Pledging in almost 30 new guys, they 
began the year as busy as ever. 

The fall semester included many 
parties and other social events. Some 
of them were the Deadman Halloween 
Party, Fall Formal, and the Founder's 
Day parties. Of course, parties were 
not the only things going on. Push 
America, their national philanthropy, 
kept them busy with their Push-A- 
Thon for 24 hours collecting money 
for the severely handicapped. The 
Scaffold Sit also helped them raise 
more money for this worthy cause. 

The spring brought Step Sing 
once again. This year was a special 
one for the brothers as they won first 
place in the men's division as well as 
the Sweepstakes trophy. Special 
thanks to Matt Snow, Step Sing direc- 
tor, for all his work. The Toll Road 
served to raise money for Push 
America. As usual, the brothers trav- 
elled to Fort Walton Beach for the 
Rose Ball Formal to wind down the 
year. Special mention to Jay Holder 
who will participate in the Push 
America, Journey of Hope ride from 
San Franciso to Charlotte to help raise 
money for the national philanthropy. 

Ben Fineburg 



The brothers celebrate their victory of 
the Sweepstakes Trophy in Step Sing 1993. 

Pi Kappa Phi 

Natalie Norton, Jay Holder, Kevin Holley 
and Tiffany Tovvnsend enjoy themselves at the 
Star and Lamp Formal. 

Pi Kappa Phi 

Some of the brothers let off some steam 
at the long-awaited Initiation Party. 

Pi Kappa Phi 



ORGANIZATIONS/GREEKS •* 99 



OMA 



EXCELLENCE THROUGH MUSIC 

The brothers of Sinfonia looked 
forward to this year with high hopes 
and expectations. As the fall began, 
rush was of the utmost importance. 
Building a good pledge class could 
only help build a better brotherhood. 

Focusing on music, the brother 
splayed for Inner City Missions, at a 
Christmas party for children with 
AIDS and finished with their annual 
Christmas concert. Socially, the year 
was full of parties, from band camp to 
Winter Formal on to the spring semi- 
formal. Step Sing, of course, brought 
much excitement as several of the 
brothers played in the Step Sing 
band. 

This year was busy for the men 
of Sinfonia, but their spirit of dedica- 
tion was seen in all their efforts. 



Some of the 
brothers take a break 
between songs to pose 
with "Santa" as they 
played for the AIDS 
House Christmas 
Party. 

Phi Mu Alp ha 

Sean Nowell, 
University Band 
Director Jon Remley, 
Travis Luttrell and 
Craig Henson perform 
with the Jazz Combo 
for Samford Palace. 

K. T. Harrell 




Brian Dunn 





100 •* Phi Mu Alpha/Delta Omicron 




Heather Martin, 
Kristen Collier, Alice 
Mansell and Jackie 
Colavita celebrate 
after their initiation. 

Delta Omicron 

Some of the 
sisters wait in the 
Delta Zeta chapter 
room for the long- 
awaited Step Sing 
show to begin. 

Jennifer Latham 



AO 




CONTINUALLY STRIVING ... 

The sisters of Delta Omicron, 
professional music fraternity for 
women, enjoyed a very successful 
year. The fall events included rush, 
Fall Carnival at Homewood Park, a 
Christmas concert, and the God Rest 
Ye Merry Gentlemen Formal with the 
brothers of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia. 

The spring brought Step Sing, 
with the sisters of Delta Zeta, and 
Junior and Senior Recitials for many 
of the sisters. The Omicron Gamma 
chapter added twelve new sisters this 
year and held the "Un-Formal" at 
Mountain Brook Inn, as well as hold- 
ing several fundraisers during the 
semester. Pursuing excellence 
through music and academics was a 
priority for all of the sisters. 

Shannon Bowman 



ORGANIZATIONS/GREEKS ^101 



AOQ 



SERVICE WITH A SMILE 

The brothers of Alpha Phi 
Omega often languish in anonymity. 
We have been mistaken for social, 
honor, and professional fraternities, 
but we are none of these. Alpha Phi 
Omega has been at Samford since 
1941, providing service to the cam- 
pus, the community and the country. 
Our goals are embodied in our three 
cardinal principals: Leadership, 
Friendship and Service. 

Our strength lies in our diver- 
sity. We combine the brotherhood of 
fraternity with the purpose of service 
This make us a powerful force on this 
campus and many others around the 
country. 



Little sister 
Jennifer Speights and 
brother Brian 
Randies rest after 
loading some wood at 
the King's Ranch. 

Alpha Phi Omega 

The brothers 
and little sisters 
with their plaque of 
appreciation for their 
work at the King's 
Ranch. 

Alpha Phi Omega 





•* Alpha Phi Omega/Gamma Sigma Sigma 




Wendy Knight 
receives some 
gardening tips from 
some local children 
on a service project. 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 

The sisters of 
Gamma Sigma Sigma 
are clowning around 
at the "What Penguin 
Is This?" formal in 
the fall. 

Gamma Sigma Sigma 




SERVICE THROUGH SISTERS 

The Delta Sigma chapter of 
Gamma Sigma Sigma, National Service 
Sorority, has participated in many 
service projects during the past year. 

With the help of the brothers of 
Alpha Phi Omega, the sisters raised 
money for the local AIDS Baby House 
and collected clothes for those staying 
at the Firehouse Mission. This year 
they also enjoyed the social atmo- 
sphere of sorority life as well as ser- 
vice. This combination added to a 
great time for all. No matter how 
hard the work, the sisters all agreed 
the best reward of all is seeing the 
happy faces of the people you have 
helped. 

Deeya Williams 




HEATHER HtOCS WENDY KNIGHT MELOOT 



ORGANIZATIONS/GREEKS^ 103 



SAMFORD UNIVERSITY 

THEATER 




Kate, played by Karen Luker, listens to 
an argument with little approval during Kiss 
Me, Kate. 

Photographic Services 

Liesl Rolin and Billy Spivey kneel in 
confession during the student production of 
Fools. 

Photographic Services 

Amy Cheek watches as Billy Spivey 
attempts to comfort Rebecca Edwards during 
her confession. 

Photographic Services 




104 •» Theatre 




Photographic Services 



ORGANIZATIONS/GREEKS •<► 105 



MARCHING 
BAND 

CONTINUING A TRADITION OF EXCELLENCE 

Two weeks before school began, the Samford Univer- 
sity Band arrived for their infamous band camp. Early 
mornings, long hours of marching in the sun, intense 
rehearsals and endless memorization were only some of 
the joys of the great experience known as band camp. 

The hours spent during camp were designed to bring 
all the members of the band together to produce a field 
show for the coming football season. The entertainment 
of the home crowd was not the only thing that was accom- 
plished from their hard work. Discipline, dedication and 
an understanding of the team concept were engrained on 
the performers. The old saying, "There is no T in team," 
was as true there as anywhere else. Learning the value of 
individual excellence and incorporating that into the big 
picture was one of many objectives of the marching band, 
and called for extra effort from all involved. 

Hard work was not the only thing the band spent 
their time doing. The many hours of intensity and con- 
centration were matched by hours of relaxation and fun. 
Several dances and parties were held during band camp 
and the rest of the semester, including the long awaited 
party at director Jon Remley's house. "Perfection... it's 
what we're all about, and it doesn't come easy." 

Brian Dunn 





While the rest of the band marches on 
the field, Sandy Walker and Rebecca Ferguson 
play percussion from the sidelines. 

K. T. Harrell 

their flags, Brenda Hodgson and 
ier march with the color guard 
during the halftime show. 

K. T. hUrrt-U 




106^Band 



Intensely watching the field commander, 
percussionist Brian Lanehart marches with 
the drumline during the halftime show. 



K. T. Harrell 





Preparing to the 
band on to the field, 
field commander 
Travis Luttrell 
marches out to his 
position. 

K. T. Harrell 



The trumpet 
section, led by senior 
Craig Henson, pushes 
towards the sidelines 
near the end of one of 
their songs. 

A.'. T. Harrell 



ORGANIZATIONS/GREEKS •* 107 



A Cappella 
Choir 



Carrying on a 53-year tradition, 
the A Cappella Choir strove for excel- 
lence in song while spreading the 
message of our Lord. Beginning in 
the summer, the choir worked on 
their music and prepared for a semes- 
ter of hard work perfecting the the 
songs for the annual spring tour and 
man\' other concerts. The choir is 
known around the world for their 
musical excellence, and they sacri- 
ficed their extra time to acheive the 
standards expected of them. 

Dr. L. G. Black, Dean of the 
School of Music, has directed the 
choir for 28 years and served as 
inspiration for excellence through 
some of the most difficult sacred 
choral literature ever written. The 
responsibility of being a member is 

great, but so are the rewards. 

Brian Dunn 



Leigh Sherer, 
Elizabeth Rowe and 
Charlotte Hemphill 
take a break during a 
day of touring 
Atlanta, GA. 

Charlotte Hemphill 

With one bus 
broken down, the 
entire choir gets to 
know each other on 
their way to 
Charleston, SC. 

Charlotte Hemphill 






A Cappella Choir/SGA 




Jennifer Davis 

President 



SGA 

S TUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 

Learning through Leadership 
Samford Style 




Mike Lunsford David Reynolds 



Vice President 
for the Senate 



Executive Assistant 
to the President 



Brett Opalinski 

Treasurer 



BillShiell 

Chaplain 







Brad Harris 

Chief Justice 



Craig Hyde 

Execu tive Assis tan t 
for Public Relations 



Samantha Lysle 

Vice President of 
Student Activities 



ORGANIZATIONS/GREEKS •* 109 



In Memory of 

George Benston Coley III 

His Sacrifice, His Service 



After Samford Palace, the band adds 
spirit to the crowd as everyone gathers 
around the bonfire to prepare for the next 
days game. 

K T. Harrell 

During the halftime show, the woodwind 
section pushes towards the sideline as they 
keep their eyes on the field commander. 

K. T. Harrell 





Alan Warren shows his endless school 
spirit as the band encourages the football 
team during the Samford vs Delaware playoff 
game. 



Phi Mu Alpha 



As the end of the game approaches, the 
victory cheer, "Go start the bus," is started 
by the marching band. 

K. T. Harrell 




id/Entre Nous/Angel Flight 




Entre Nous 



Working late, 
Jennifer Latham 
enters corrections 
into the computer. 



Entre Nous 



Sports editor, 
Melanie Green 
searches through 
stacks of pictures to 
put the finishing 
touches on her 
section. 

Entre Nous 




Front row: Amy Redd, Katie Mixon, Lisa Fields, Laura Tucker, Katie Clouser 
Jenny Corey, Rie Peeler Second row: Cathy Glenn, Julie Danford, Mindi 
Richardson, Susan Furey, Deandra Little, Kathryn Paradis, Martha Hurston, 
Kathy Clayton, Celeste Burton, Yvonne Williams Angel Flight 



With thoughts of an entire book 
to put together, the staff of the Entre 
Nous set off on another great year of 
hard work and fun. Most of this 
year's staffers worked on the book 
last year so learning to work together 
was not a problem. The year pro- 
ceeded as normal with the exception 
of the advisor, Dr. Edna Ellison, mov- 
ing to California. Her loss placed 
greater responsibility on all of the 
section editors to get their work done 
well and on time. 

Making the move from hand- 
drawn layouts to "the Mac" was a 
great improvement if you understood 
how to use it. All editors took classes 
to learn Pagemaker and design their 
own layouts. Many late nights (and 
early mornings) were spent in the 
office trying to finish all the work for 
each deadline. Even into the summer, 
several sections worked to finish 
pages from late in the semester. 

Working on the staff offered great 
experience for those studying journal- 
ism and those who simply enjoy 
working on staff. The 1993 Entre 
Nous included: Tiffany Townsend 
(Editor-in-Chief), Mark Mantooth (Aca- 
demics), Melanie Green (Sports), Brian 
Dunn (Greeks/Organizations), Lisa 
Oliphant (Campus Life), Jennifer 
Latham (People), Jackie Colavita ( Cam- 
pus Ministries), Bonnie Siler ( Mini- 
Mag)- Brian Dunn 

An gel Flight 

Angel Filght is a service organiza- 
tion that supports AFROTC, Air Force, 
Air Force Association and Arnold Air 
Society. They are a non-profit organi- 
zation who hold annual parties, 
dances, and fundraisers to help raise 
money and have fun. Heavily in- 
volved with POW/MIA, tutoring at 
Hall Kent Elementary and Walk 
America for The March of Dimes, the 
year stayed busy with all kinds of 
projects. Teaming up with the cadets 
from ROTC offered more chances to 
work to support their common goal. 

Dining In and Dining Out were the 
two big events of the year. Both of 
these nights included dinner, speak- 
ers and a dance to end things up. 

Kathy Clayton 



ORGANIZATIONS/GREEKS •* 111 





OF SERVICE 



Executive Council 



Local Missions 



Ville Crew 



Son Reflectors 



Word Players 



iNC 



Family Court 



Hawaii 



Summer Missions 



BSU Choir 



World Awareness 



BSU 



112-114 



115 



116 



117 



118 



119 



120 



121 



122 



123 



124 



125 



12 •* Division 




Buck Buchanan 



•* Scot McCosh 
and Jennifer Davis 
stop for a quick hug 
before the beginning 
of the last BSU 
Breakaways. 



STUDENT MINISTRIES •* 113 



It was a year of 
change for Cam- 
pus Ministries, 
and what better 
way to start 
change, than to 
go straight from 
the top? Follow- 
ing her call from 
God, the new 
Campus Minis- 
tries director 
came to "Sammy 
U", and with the 
help of her Ex- 
ecutive Council, 
she met the 
organizations 
intended goals. 

"Overall, our 
goal was to help 
Christians grow, 
and help non- 
Christians to 
understand who 
Jesus Christ is," 
director Brenda 
Sanders said. 
The group also 
had a goal to 
meet with-in 
themselves: to 
unify all the 
individual minis- 
try teams, so 
they could un- 
derstand each 
other and pro- 
ductively work 
together. The 
leaders met 
regularly to 
discuss agendas 
for future meet- 
ings, and to plan 
s activi- 
ie positive 



outcome of their 
goal, was the 
merging of BSU's 
Executive Coun- 
cil with the 
Executive Coun- 
cil of Campus 
Ministries. 
"Christians need 
to be unified," 
Sanders said. 
With both coun- 
cils, "under one 
roof," it was 
easier to work as 
a team. As a 
college student, 
Sanders at- 
tended Baylor 
University and 
received her 
Masters in Com- 
mercial Art. She 
then went to 
Southwestern 
Theological 
Seminary for a 
Masters in Reli- 
gious Education. 
Sanders came to 
Birmingham 
from Houston, 
Texas, where she 
held the same 
type of position 
at Houston Bap- 
tist University, as 
she does here at 
Samford. "I 
never thought 
I'd leave," she 
said, "I was 
perfectly happy 
where I was. God 
really changed 
my heart, and I 
knew this is 



where He wanted 
me to be." Sand- 
ers loved work- 
ing and 
fellowshipping 
with the stu- 
dents, and was 
actively involved 
in everything the 
organization did. 
Whenever there 
was an activity 
with the title 
Campus Minis- 
tries attached to 
it, she was there. 
"One of the 
things that drew 
me to Samford 
was the caliber 
of students and 
their real desire 
for ministry," 
she explained. "I 
wanted to be 
involved in 
touching the 
lives of students 
who would go 
out and touch 
the world." Not 
only was Sanders 
available for 
members of her 
organization, but 
her office door 
was open to 
anyone who had 
questions about 
Campus Minis- 
tries, or just 
needed a shoul- 
der to cry on. 
Many students 
who were about 
to overload on 
stress came to 



her for comfort, 
because they 
knew she 
wouldn't turn 
them away. "I'm 
here for the 



students," she 
said, "and I'll 
stay — as long at 
God wants me t( 
be here." 

Jackie Colavii 



•» Sandra Betts and Monica Ikner, 
outgoing Local Missions Coordinators, give 
gifts to the newly appointed coordinators, 
Allison Lee and Holly Sparks. 



**** 




Jackie Colin 



■* Members of the BStI Choir's Clown 
Team perform at the last BSU Breakaway 



Executive Council 






Brenda & her Executives 




•» (top L): 1992-1993 Members of the Student 
Ministries Executive Council. Front Row: Director 
Brenda Sanders, President April Robinson, Monica 
Ikner. Back Row: Jon Robertson, Scot McCosh, Toni 
Baggiano, David Fleming, Sandra Betts. 

•» (top R): Director of Student Ministries Brenda 
Sanders and senior April Robinson discuss the 
agenda for the officer's meeting. 

•♦ (bottom L): Bill Shiell presents Brenda 
Sanders with a gift from the BSU at the last 
Breakaway. BSU choir members applaud. 



Jackie Colavita 



STUDENT MINISTRIES** 115 



Prez.April & Student 

Ministries 



April 
Robinson, Presi- 
dent of the Ex- 
ecutive Council 
of Student Minis- 
tries, can be 
found anywhere 
from delivering 
sermons in Reid 
Chapel, to plan- 
ning student 
ministry events 
in Director 
Brenda Sanders 
office. Robinson 
was a senior 
honoree at Hang- 
ing of the Green, 
and helped to 
oversee many 
student minis- 
tries projects 
such as Christian 
Emphasis Week, 
and Boot Scoot 
Boogie. She was 
also partly in 
charge of the 
nine local mis- 
sions Student 
Ministries offers. 
Each of the 
ministries gave 
students the 
chance to lead 
personal Bible 
studies and 
discipleship 
groups to the 
Samford commu- 
nity. "See ya' at 
the Pole", a 7:00 
a.m. meeting of 
over 200 stu- 
dents at the 



flagpole to pray 
for the school 
and our govern- 
ment officials, 
was organized by 
World Aware- 
ness. Boot Scoot 
Boogie was also 
sponsored by 
World Aware- 
ness, and aside 
from raising 
money, the 
dance offered 
students the 
opportunity to 
watch freshman 
Eric Motley 
attempt to learn 
to square dance. 
"We were all in 
the same boat. 
Nobody knew 
how to do that!" 
Brenda Sanders 
said. April 
Robinson says 
she "saw student 
ministries as my 
opportunity to 
make a differ- 
ence in the lives 
of individual 
students, as well 
as in my commu- 
nity." Robinson 
oversaw the 
officers on the 
executive coun- 
cil. She was 
responsible for 
"spurring on the 
spiritual growth 
for the council." 
She delivered 



devotions and 
encouraged 
members to 
"write a mission 
statement for 
their individual 
lives, what their 
long term goal 
was." After 
graduation, in 
addition to 
planning her 
wedding, 
Robinson was 
the Co- BSU 
director at Appa- 
lachian State 
University in 
Boone, NC. She 
said, "The col- 
lege years, ages 
18 to 22, were a 
crucial time for 
questioning. We 
asked, who are 
we? Who did we 
want to be? 
Where did we 
come from? 
Where were we 
going? Inevitably 
we asked the 
question, is there 
a God, and what 
does he have to 
do with me? I 
wanted to be a 
part of this 
questioning 
time, and help 
find the fulfilling 
answers that 
would not leave 
you feeling void 
and confused." 



In essence, stu- 
dent ministries 
helped complete 
the meaning of 
our motto, "for 
God, For Learn- 
ing, Forever." 
Samford profes- 
sors helped 
institute the "For 



Learning" por- 
tion. However, il 
was the purposq 
and goal of 
student minis- 
tries to imple- 
ment the theme 
"For God" and 
"Forever." 

Robyn Blaikj 




•*(top): Senior 
honorees April 
Robinson and Alan 
Burton at the 
Hanging of the 
Green. 



Buch Buchanan 



•*• (bottom): 
Student Ministries 
president April 
Robinson preaches 
to the student body 
in a convocation. 



esident/Local Missions 




Local Amissions 




(top): Frshman Ashley Adams, of iNC, 
pours this boy a drink during her visit to 
the children. 




(bottom): The Son Reflectors goof off 
ind take a quick snapshot during 
homecoming day. 



Local Missions 
had a way for 
anyone to get 
involved in min- 
istry. This faction 
of Campus Minis- 
tries consisted of 
Adopt- a -Grand- 
parent, AIDS 
Babies, a literacy 
program, 
Samford iNC, 
Family Court, 
Habitat for Hu- 
manity, Son 
Reflectors, Word 
Players, and Ville 
Crew. Each group 
kept in contact 
with the Campus 
Ministries Coun- 
cil through 
Sandra Betts and 
Monica Ikner, 
who acted as 
liaisons. In the 
Adopt-a-Grand- 
parent mission, 
participating 
students went to 
a nursing home 
once a week to visit 
their "adopted" 
grandparent. The 
students shared 
Christ and gave 
them special 
attention to help 
compensate for 
the lack of family 
visits. The stu- 
dents who par- 
ticipated in the 
AIDS Babies 
mission volun- 
teered at a home 
in Birmingham 



called, A Baby's 
Place, once a 
week, for an 
hour, to entertain 
the children. 
There were two 
caretakers in 
addition to the 
volunteers, and it 
was possible for 
the students to 
train to become 
caretakers. The 
Local Missions 
literacy program 
was started after 
Marriot Food 
Services asked for 
a program to aid 
their employees. 
Marriot agreed to 
pay for the neces- 
sary materials if 
Campus Minis- 
tries would pro- 
vide the person- 
nel. However, 
none of the 
Marriot employ- 
ees came forward 
for the help, so 
the mission did 
not fulfill it's 
original goal. The 
participants in 
the literacy pro- 
gram have hopes 
for the future. 
Samford iNC, (i 
Need Christ), 
participants went 
once a week to 
the Harrison 
Recreation Cen- 
ter, the Jimmy 
Hale Mission for 
homeless men 



and the Baptist 
Center. In these 
inner-city envi- 
ronments, the 
students shared 
Christ with the 
residents, espe- 
cially children. 
Family Court 
went to a juvenile 
detention center 
once a week. The 
students were 
able to build 
relationships with 
the youths, and 
share Christ with 
them. Habitat for 
Humanity partici- 
pants repaired or 
built houses for 
low income fami- 
lies. This mission 
is associated with 
it's national 
organization. 
Students in the 
Word Players and 
the Son Reflectors 
missions went 
into the commu- 
nity to perform 
plays and skits 
based on Scrip- 
ture. The Son 
Reflectors used 
solely mimed 
skits, while the 
Word Players 
used dialogue. 
The Ville Crew 
mission partici- 
pants went to the 
inner-city to 
interact and 
share Christ with 

the children. 

Rachel Dwyer 



STUDENT MINISTRIES** 117 



Ville Crew was Spreading 

God's Love 



The inner city 
mission group, 
Ville Crew, spent 
another exciting 
year ministering 
to the children 
of Loveman's 
Village. 

The purpose of 
this group was to 
lead these chil- 
dren to Jesus 
Christ by show- 
ing love, con- 
cern, and per- 
sonal attention. 
Each Saturday, 
Samford stu- 
dents met at 9 
a.m. to go play 
with the chil- 
dren, sing songs, 
and share a bible 
story. 

Included in the 
events of this 
ministry, was the 
annual Fall 
Carnival at 
Loveman's Vil- 
lage, and Kid's 
Day in the 
Spring. These 
events were 
special to both 
the students and 
the children. 
Games, prizes, 
food and fun 
were all a part of 
these activities. 

Ville Crew 
sponsored a Big 
Brother / Big 
Sister program 
h stu- 
a)uld 




* 


■* 






> ~!w <•- 






■ 




*w 


pt- 


| 




1 




A 


**** ***r«fr* 




'** ** 










m 







commit to a more 
personal and 
involved rela- 
tionship with one 
specific child. 
Vital to the 
Ville Crew minis- 
try, was the 
weekly prayer 



time. It was a 
time to share 
concerns and to 
pray about the 
needs of the 
children as well 
as the students 
that were in- 
volved. 

Laurie Rowe 



■* (top): 
David Brooks 
with a young 
boy at 
Loveman's 
Village. 

•* (bottom): 
Monica Ikner 
clowing at the 
village with a 
young child. 



s 



•O 



Crew/Son Reflectors 



With the Son Ref lectors- 

a face is worth 1000 words 



They may 
not say much, 
but the mes- 
sage of Son 
Reflectors is 
unmistakable. 

This clown 
and mime 
ministry, is 
made up of 12 
students who 
have a passion 
for sharing the 
gospel through 
their emotions, 
actions and 
facial expres- 
sions. 

This group 
met once a 
week to re- 
hearse, and 
performed for 




•» (bottom): The 
Son Reflectors mime 
for a local youth 
group. 



•» (top): Matt 
Brewer, in his clown 
suit, paints this 
little girl's face on 
Homecoming 
Saturday.Homecoming 
was a big day for 
many organizations 
to entertain children, 
as well as students. 



the Birmingham 
Festival of Trees, 
the Children's 
Hospital, the We 
Love Homewood 
Christmas Pa- 
rade and for 
youth groups at 
various 
churches. 

All the mem- 
bers do their 
own make-up 
and design their 
own costumes. 
The mimes per- 
form to contem- 
porary Christian 
music, and the 
majority of the 
clown skits are 
based on Chris- 
tian principles. 

"It gives a 
twist to the 
normal ministry- 
you're shown 
instead of told," 
said co-leader, 
Todd Caudel. 
"Many times 
people learn 
more from what 
they can see." 



•» (middle L): The 
1992-93 Son 
Reflectors. Back 
Row: Collyn Milsted, 
Heidi Bartlett, 
Jessica Lockwood, 
Jaishree Patel, 
Bethany Hazzard. 
Front Row: Amy 
Powley, Matt Brewer 



Son Reflectors 



STUDENT MINISTRIES •* 119 




With a talent 
for acting and a 
love for the 
Lord, the Word 
Players spent 
another year 
sharing the 
message of Jesus 
Christ. 

"We want to 
know God, we 
want to make 
Him known, and 
we do that 
through drama," 
said leader Amy 
Cheek. Our 
purpose is 
straight from 
scripture, she 
said. We call it 
our vision verse: 
"For I have 
raised you up 
for this very 
purpose: that 
you might know 
my power and 
that my name 
might be pro- 
claimed in all 
the earth. "- 
Exodus 9:16 

With this verse 
as their guide, 
the Word Play- 
ers performed 
skits for various 



attempting to 
bronze their 
bodies, this 
group of 1 5 
dedicated per- 
formers trav- 
eled to Houston, 
Texas where 
they witnessed 
at several 
churches. 

The group 
took some of 
their drama 
from books, but 
the rest they 
wrote them- 
selves. So stu- 
dents had the 
chance to watch 
their peers, the 
Word Players 
performed for a 
convocation, 
Residence Life, 
and the Baptist 
Student Union. 

•* (top L): Tana 
Baggiano, Toni 
Baggiano, and Renee 
Hyland at the Word 
Players Fall 
Carnival booth. 

•» (middle R): 
The Word Players 
stayed at the 
Westvievv Mission 
Center in Houston, 
Texas during 
spring break. 

«*■ (bottom): 
Tiffany Triplett, 
(left) and the rest 
oi the "Company"! 



Word Plavers< 



20 •» Word Players/iNC 




Jesus loves the little, T 

children 




Taking the love for 
the Lord that flowed 
through their hearts, 
and pouring it into 
the hearts of the 
children, was the 
main focus of iNC. 

i Need Christ, with 
a lower case letter "i" 
to take away the focus 
of self-centeredness, 
met every Thursday. 
The members gath- 
ered together and half 
the group went to the 
Baptist Center, while 
the other half went to 
Sardis Baptist Church. 
Here, the students 
shared their indi- 




iNC 



iNC 



•* ( bottom ):This young 
man must have won the last 
round of Bingo! The 
children loved for the 
students to play games 
with them. 

■* (middleR):This child 
decided he would "chill" 
for this picture. The 
children weren't camera 
shy! 



vidual talents by 
teaching crafts, recre- 
ations and bible 
stories to children 
after school. 

The group also 
regularly visited the 
Jimmy Hale Mission 
for homeless men, 
and the Harrison 
Recreation Center. 
Though students 
went to these places 
to be a blessing to 
the children, they left 
with the special feel- 
ing, that they too had 
been blessed. 

"It's a chance to 
build relationships 
with the kids, "said 
senior Scott Walden. 
"You're able to have 
an impact on their 
lives and make a 
difference." 



•» (Top):Freshman, Jeff 
Ball entertained these two 
children with a game of 
Bingo. 

■*■ (middle L):The 
members of iNC posed with 
the children they visited. 
iNC played with these 
children weekly. 



Student Ministries •* 121 



Family Court 



Juvenile of- 
fenders held in 
the Jefferson 
County deten- 
tion center 
were visited 
weekly by the 
Family Court 
Volunteer Pro- 
gram. This 
program was 
designed to 
give the youths 
at the center 
Christian 
people to talk 
to, share their 
feelings with 
and receive 
advice from. 

The volun- 
teers give of 
their time to 
bring encour- 
agement to the 
youths, and 
give them the 
hope they need 
to look forward 
to each new 
day. Volunteers 
also shared 
about their 
faith in God, 
with the hopes 
that the youths 
would want to 
know more 
about Christ 
and how He 



could help them 
through their 
troubled times. 

The youths, 
ranging in age 
from 12 to 18 
years old, were 
put in the cen- 
ter because 
they had been 
arrested for a 
crime or they 
had previous 
family prob- 
lems. While 
they awaited 
their trail date, 
they needed 
people, young 
college stu- 
dents, to give 
them guidance 
and encourage 
them to change 
their lives 
around and set 
new goals while 
they still could. 

In the future, 
Family Court 
hopes to pro- 
vide after-care 
programs for 
the juveniles by 
getting them 
involved with 
community 
churches and 
organizations. 




•» Students who 
particpated in 
Family Court valued 
the prayer time they 
shared before 
ministering. 

"* Scot McCosh, 
Kelly Snow and Ron 
Greene have a little 
fun while on one of 
their several trips 
to the youth 
detention center. 

•» Praying before 
they enter the 
center, Scot McCosh, 
Kelly Snow and Ron 
Greene hope to 
provide a listening 
ear to some of the 
young people inside. 



photo by Family Cob 



Family Court/Hawaii 



Aloha from Hawaii 



The Alabama 
Baptist Student 
Union had a 
partnership with 
the Hawaii Bap- 
tist Student 
Union— a fact 
that was un- 
known to most 
of campus. But 
Campus Minis- 
tries unveiled 
this secret and 
made Samford 
the first univer- 
sity to send 
students to the 
"Aloha State" to 
do mission work 
for our partners. 




Nine students, 
including Direc- 
tor Brenda Sand- 
ers, went to the 
University of 
Hawaii to repaint 
their BSU dorm. 
This dorm was a 
90 year old plan- 
tation house that 
provided stu- 
dents who 
couldn't afford 
the state's living 
costs, a way to 
go to college. 

The task, how- 
ever, was not as 
easy as just 
painting, the 
group first had to 
scrape the old 
paint off the 
building, then 
sand it down, 
clean out termite 
eggs, and finally, 
they were able to 
paint. In addition 
their construc- 
tion work, the 
students led 
worship services 
at two different 



■* (top):Casey 
Fitzsimmons helps 
carry a beam while 
repairing the Hawaii 
Baptist Student 
Union dorm. 

•» (middle R): 
Holly Sparks soaks 
up some of the sun's 
rays while sweeping 
the porch of the 
building. Each 
student helped to 
get the dorm clean 
and ready to paint. 



churches, and at 
the University's 
BSU. 

The Ministerial 
Association 
helped to fi- 
nance the trip, 
which was over 
Spring Break. 
The rest of the 
cost, $600 per 
person, was 
raised by the 
students. Some 
were sponsored 
by various orga- 
nizations, while 
others received 
donations. One 
student paid her 
way with money 
she won from a 
writing contest! 
But what ever it 
took, those 
determined to 
participate 
found a way to 
pay their ex- 
penses, and their 
visit to our 
"partner state" 
was a true suc- 
cess. 



■» (middle L): 
Bethany Shackleford 
helps scrape the old 
paint off the 
building. 



•* (bottom): 
Monika Ikner and 
Jade Acker attempt 
to keep their 
balance on a scaffold 
while scraping 
paint off the 
building. 



(Student Ministrie 



STUDENT MINISTRIES •* 123 



s 



ummer 



Mi 



issions 



Due to their 
successful fund 
raisers, the Sum- 
mer Missions 
division of Cam- 
pus Ministries 
sent 31 students 
to missions in 
the United States 
and overseas. 

The fund rais- 
ers were led by 
Toni Baggiano 
and Lisa Stagg, 
who along with 
others, organized 
the Fall Carnival, 
Cookies To Go, 
and exam care 
packages. 

The Fall Carni- 
val raised $1500, 
and allowed 
every on, and off, 
campus organiza- 
tion to pull 



together and 
work on a joint 
project. 

Cookies To Go 
mailed forms to 
students' homes, 
so parents could 
send treats to 
their children. 
Cookies were sent 
for birthdays, a 
wish of good luck 
or just a thinking 
of you. The caf 
helped make the 
cookies, and 
Alpha Phi Omega 
delivered them. 

Exam care 
packages were 
also ordered by 
parents for their 
students during 
exam week. 

The profits 
helped to send 




Toni Baggiano 



•* (boi \ kazakh girl at the Music 

ival in Madeo. 




students to places 

such as Russia, 

Hawaii, and 

Alaska. Trips like 

this are hard to 

afford, several of 

the privileged 

mission goers 

said, but if the 

chance comes 

along, take it, 

because the 

memories last a 

lifetime. 

Rachel Dwyer 



•*• (top): L to R- 
Sandra Betts, a 
Mission Service 
Volunteer, and 
Andrea Henderson 
stopped along the 
side of the road in 
American Samoa to 
eat a picnic lunch. 



•» (middle R): Toni 
Baggiano at the 
Children's Cancer 
Hospital in Alma 
Ata, Kazakhstan with 
her new friend, 
Nastia. 




photo h\ S.miira B etts 



•*■ (bottom R): The home of the pastor in Western Samoa. Sandra 
Betts lived there for three days while she participated in Backyard 



Bible Club. 



ner Missions/BSU Choir 



BSU Choir 





BSU Choir 



BSU Choir 



The BSU Choir per- 
formed often through- 
out the school year. 

The 90 member 
organization sang in 
various churches and 
in convo. They also had 
many retreats for wit- 
nessing purposes, as well 
to as grow stronger in 
their own faith. 

In the fall, the choir 
took a mini tour of 
Nashville, Tennessee 
where they sang at 
nursing homes, a home- 
less shelter for men, and 

-*(topR):The 1992-93 
BSU Officers. Front Row: 
Roger Davis (Correspondant 
Secretary), Dan Bell 
(Ministry Team 
Coordinator). Back Row:Jay 
Carson (member at Large), 
Kathy McRae (Secretary), 
Jeff Swords (Chaplain), 
Christy Crow (Treasurer), 
Cory Pitts (Member at 
Large), Kelly Fields 
(president), Matt Cook 
(Director), Elizabeth Meeks 
(Vice-President), Melodi 
Isbell (Social Chairperson) 
Not Pictured: Joe Boshears 
(Senator) 



BSU Choir 

churches. In addition 
to their singing perfor- 
mances at night, dur- 
ing the day they helped 
in soup kitchens. 

During the summer, 
while most students 
went home, the choir 
continued it's witness 
to Charleston, South 
Carolina. Here, they 
sang at nursing homes, 
churches, retirement 
homes, and even for an 
audience in front of 
the USS Frank Cable 
Naval ship in port. 

■*■ (top L): The 1992-93 
BS U Choir. 

•*■ (middle L): A few of 
the children the choir got 
to play with. 

•*■ (bottom): Matt Cook, 
director, took charge 
during rehearsal. 



STUDENT MINISTRIES •* 125 



Making the World Aware 



Think Glo- 
bally, act lo- 
cally. This was 
the theme for 
the World 
Awareness orga- 
nization. "You do 
what you can in 
your part of the 
world," said 
junior, David 
Flemming. 

By raising 
money right 
here on 

Samford's cam- 
pus, this group 
was able to help 
less fortunate 
people in na- 
tions abroad. 
Students gave up 
a meal on their 
ticket to benefit 
the Hunger 
Relief project 
during "ban the 
caf." This money 
was sent to 
people in Croatia 
and Yugoslavia. 
There was also a 
T-shirt drive to 
support a Chris- 
tian service mis- 
sion, and a "boot 
scoot" dance to 
raise money for 
the Manna 
Project, which 
ministers aid to 
nations in need. 

I here are 
many people 
starving and 




•♦ Learning several new dances at the 
Boot Scoot in the law school parking deck, 
Ann Hausier, Sara Mowry, Heather Hudson, 
LeAnn Samples, Melonie Norris, Allison 
Kent and Heather Ellis try a variation on a 
square dance. 

"*The caller provided entertainment for 
the night as well as instruction for the 
"green" squaredancers. 

•♦ World Hunger Chairman Scot McCosh 
and Student Ministries Director Brenda 
Sanders look over a list of prizes being 
given away at the Boot Scoot for World 
1 lunger. 



without a place to call 
home. By the leadership 
of World Awareness, and 
the support of students, it 
was possible for many of 
these needy people to be 
reached. 



26 



rid Awareness/BSU 




Baptist Student Union 




•o (top):The 
Baptist 
Student Union 
Intramural 
football team 
gathers for a 
picture after a 
game. 

•* (bottom 
R):L to R- 
Bethany 
Shackleford, 
Ben Caldwell, 
Leslie Peacock, 
and Robert 
McClurkan 
relax at the 
BSU Christmas 
party. 



•» (middle): The 
1992-93 Baptist 
Student Union 
officers. Back 
Row:(L to R) 
Director Brenda 
Sanders, President 
Leslie Peacock, 
Bethany Shakelford, 
Debra Silverstein, 
Hope Dutton, Kim 
Osborne. Front Row: 
Ben Caldwell, Ricky 
Le tson, Bill Shiell . 

•» (bottom L): BSU 
"family" Step Sing 
participants. 



BSU was an 
active organization 
that sponsored a 
number of differ- 
ent activities on 
and off campus. 

BSU Breakaway 
was held weekly, 
where the stu- 
dents planned a 
worship service 
with a guest 
speaker. They also 
were involved in a 
number of Bible 
study and dis- 
cipleship groups. 

There was a 
Christmas party, 
a Boot Scoot 
Boogie, which 
was a joint 
project with 
World Awareness, 
and two retreats. 

Their first 
retreat was an 



overnight expe- 
dition held in a 
cave during the 
fall. Hence, it 
was called, the 
Great Adven- 
ture. For their 
second retreat, 
they took a trip 
to a camp for 
mentally and 
physically 
handicapped 
children. Here, 
they helped 
with the camp's 
maintenance 
and repairs. 

BSU partici- 
pated in the 
intramurals, 
Step Sing, the 
Hunger and 
Homelessness 
Clean-up and 
the Fall Carni- 
val. Rachel Dwyer 




BSU 



STUDENT MINISTRIES •* 111 




Model UN/ Latif 



100 



Brewer/ Socratic Society 101 



\ 28 •* Division 







Buck Buchanan 



■» Construction on 
the Harwell G. Davis 
library began early in the 
year. 



ACADEMICS •* 129 




ACADEMICS 



SAM FORD was 
Alabama's largest 
privately supported 
instutition of higher 
learning. Founded 
in 1841, it became 
one of the first in 
Alabama to be 
accredited by the 
Southern Associa- 
tion of Colleges and 
Schools, in 1920. 

Although the 
Samford tradition 
reaches back a 
century and a half, 
the university 
continued to be 
recognized for the 
excellence of its 



academic programs. 

Samford 
offered 1 9 degree 
programs in eight 
colleges—the 
Howard College of 
Arts and Sciences, 
the Cumberland 
School of Law, the 
Ida V. Moffett 
School of Nursing, 
the Orlean Bullard 
Beeson School of 
Education, the 
Beeson Divinity 
School, and the 
Schools of Busi- 
ness, Nursing and 
Music. 

Samford fac- 



ulty members held 
degrees from more 
than 1 00 universi- 
ties in the United 
States, Europe, and 
Latin America. No 
graduate students 
taught classes at 
Samford. 

Samford' s 
4,248 students 
enjoyed the quality 
instruction and 
human scale of a 
small, private liberal 
arts college, and the 
pace and program of 
a comprehensive 
university offering 
89 academic maiors 



and 1 ,200 courses. 
An extensive pro- 
gram of computer 
literacy offered 
students access to 
hundreds of PC's in 
labs spread around 
the Samford cam- 
pus, plus computer- 
assisted learning 
throughout the 
curriculum. 

Samford was 
prominantly noted 
in a trio of presti- 
gious publications 
for the overall 
excellence of its 
programs. Samford 
was cited by: U. S. 



News and World 
Report as one of 
America's top 25 
regional universi- 
ties; Money Maga- 
zine as one of the 
top 40 "best buys" 
among American 
colleges and univer 
sities; and 
Peterson's Competi 
tive Colleges as one 
of the top 10 percer 
of American col- 
leges and universi- 
ties that, "consis- 
tently attract the 
brightest students." 
Located six 
miles south of down- 



H 




Photo by Entre Nous staff 



Photo by Entre Nous staff 



mics •*• 130 



„ 




town Birmingham, 
■Samford's $170 
million Georgian- 
Colonial campus 
had been described 
i as a "Williamsburg 
in Alabama." 
Samford students 
benefit from the best 
of both worlds: a 
campus environ- 
ment for study and 
i social enjoyment, 
i and easy access to 
Alabama's largest 
economic and social 
center. 

Samford' s 
world was a multi- 
cultural one, with 



students from 43 
states and 40 coun- 
tries. Eight years 
ago, the University 
expanded its cam- 
pus to the British 
Isles, purchasing a 
100-year old family 
hotel in London to 
serve as an Interna- 
tional Study Centre. 
The residential centre 
is the keystone in 
Samford's commit- 
ment to heighten the 
global awareness of 
students through study 
programs in Europe, 
Latin America and 

/\Slu.. -- taken from S U. publication 



AFTER HAVING 

served nine years as 
president of Wingate 
College, in North 
Carolina, Dr. Tho- 
mas E. Corts became 
Samford's 17th 
president. 

Born in Terre 
Haute, Indiana, and 
reared in Ashtabula, 
Ohio, Dr. Corts is a 
graduate of George- 
town College of 
Kentucky. He holds 
Master of Arts and 
Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees from 
Indiana University 
and an honorary 



doctorate from 
Georgetown College. 

Prior to 
assuming the presi- 
dency of Wingate 
College, in 1974, he 
held a number of 
position at George- 
town College includ- 
ing assistant to the 
president, director of 
planning and devel- 
opment, executive 
dean, and executive 
vice president. He 
also served as co- 
ordinator of the 
Higher Education 
Consortium of 
Kentucky. 



During his 
first year at Samford, 
Dr. Corts inaugurated 
such activities as the 
Semester Abroad 
Program, which 
offers opportunities 
for international 
study through a 
Samford Centre in 
London, England. 
He continued to 
provide leadership 
that enabled Sam- 
ford to reach new 
heights in enroll- 
ment, in computer 
intensification, and in 
academic recogni- 

LlOn. -taken from S. U. publication 



Far left: The 

Belltower atop the Library. 
Left top: The Tower Bridge, 
photographed by a London 
student. Lower Left: Mme. 
Blaudeau and her children 
watch a play. Center: A 
student enjoying a peaceful 
part of the quad. Left: 
President Thomas Corts. 
Below: John Autry sings 
Rossini. 




Photo by Entre Nous staff 



Photo bx Mark Mantooth 



Academics •> 131 



n 



London 



OF THE MANY 
advantages enjoyed 
by the students at 
this university, the 
opportunity to study 
abroad was the most 
unique and probably 
the most exciting. 

London 
Study Cen- 
tre offers 
courses 
abroad 

The campus 
at 12 Ashburn 
Gardens in London. 
England, was 
purchased and 
reconditioned in 
time to accomodate 
its first group oi 
students in the tall 
ol 1984, and ever 
since has succeeded 
m attracting stu- 
dents and faculty to 
trn and to live m a 



Charles' palace, and 
generally located in 
an area which made 
London's attractions 
easily accessible. 
The facility could 
accomodate up to 
19 fall or spring 
term students and 
up to 50 Jan-termers 
during each of its 
two short sessions. 
To take care 
of its students, the 
cost of the trip 
covered the basics 
such as airfare, 
twelve hours of 
tuition, housing 
costs, a continental 
breakfast each 
morning, and a 
weekly stipend to 
serve as a meal 
allowance. 




Photo b\ Dennis Clark 



Photo h\ Dennis Clark 



'Paris 




a. 



<*t*r> 



v 




Left: The view 
down Ashburn Gardens, 
Samford's London Study 
Centre (to the left of the 
hotel), is located in an 
affluent neighborhood 
near the cultural center 
of the city. Lower Left: 
Only seven blocks from 
the Study Centre, the 



Royal Albert Hall offers 
many cultural events, 
especially concerts 
featuring the London 
Symphony. Center: An 
inner building in the 
Tower of London stands 
after nearly seven 
centuries. Above: 
Spanning the River 



Photo by Dennis Clark 

Thames, the Tower 
Bridge connects the 
archaic Tower of 
London to the newer 
and more fashionable 
Docklands area of 
London. Below: 
Mixing the old with the 
new, the Louvre with its 
glass pyramid entrance. 



Along with these, the 
cost also included 
tickets to eight plays 
and weekend trips to 
Paris and to destina- 
tions within the U. K. 
A myriad of 
educational opportuni- 
ties abounded not only 
in the classroom but in 
students' own inde- 
pedant studies and 
internships. Students 
have gotten to see, 
firsthand, the workings 
of London solicitors, 
the Liberal Democrats 
(Britain's third political 
party), the interna- 
tional accounting firm 
of Coopers and 
Librand, and even 
Parliament, among 
others. 



Photo bv Dennis Clark 




Paris included on London Students' 

lists of places to see 
INCLUDED IN THE COST of studying at 
Samford's London Study Centre is a three- 
day trip to Paris, which introduces its 
visitors to a rich cache of museums and 
monuments. Students can opt to take part 
in a guided tour of the city, or to discover 
the City of Lights independantly. 

The tour covers sights such as the 
famed Eiffel Tower and l'Arc de Triomphe 
by bus, and it allows time to roam through 
the Notre Dame cathedral and the exhibits 
in the Louvre. The last day of the tour is 
spent in the grand palace and gardens of 
Versailles. 

Academics •> 133 



n 



Library Renovations 



llll BANGING of 
hammers, the roar 
oi power tools, and 
the moan of diesel- 
powered cement 
trucks was a wel- 
comed detriment to 
the usually placid 
Harwell G. Davis 
Library. Welcomed 
because students 
realized that when 
the renovations to 
the library were 
complete, their 
Stud) area would be 
vastly improved. 

Harwell 

G. Davis 

gets a 

facelift 

The addition 
to the Librar) added 

md 36,000 
square Peel to the 
existing facility 
approximate^ one- 
half again lis oi 
nal si/e. In the new 
Idition will he 
nee 
to the 




medical sciences, 
and the social 
sciences. Also 
included in the 
plans was space for 
compact storage and 
attractive places for 
stud) . The next 
step in the library's 
plans was to expand 
the collection and to 
indent 







Photo by Mark Mantooth 









Centennial Walk 





AT THE TIME OF 

its refurbishment, 
the Davis Library 
housed 525,000 
bound volumes, 
33,000 periodicals, 
and 1,652 magazine 
titles. Also under 
its roof were special 
collections includ- 
ing the State History 
of Alabama, the 
History of Alabama 
Baptists, and the 
region's finest 
amassing of John 
Ruskin's works. 

Center: A giant 
crane looming behind the 
library disquiets the 
Georgian-Colonial skyline. 
Far Lower Left: Workers 
brave Birmingham's unpre- 
dictable weather to 
complete work on the 
library. Bottom Left: 
Centennial Walk adorns 
campus. Upper Left: Con- 
struction begins. Left: 
The building takes shape. 



Photo b\ Mark Mantooth 



Photo by Mark Mantooth 




Samford's Walk of Fame 



Centennial 
Walk was the final 
completed element 
of the University's 
master plan for the 
construction of this 
campus. The 
walkway com- 
memorates the 
100th anniversary of 
the school's reloca- 
tion of from East 



Lake to its present 
location. 

The campus' 
centerpiece, Centen- 
nial Walk offers an 
opportunity for 
those to whom 
Samford has meant 
a great deal, to take 
part in a lasting 
tribute to the Uni- 
versity while offer- 



ing a financial gift. 
Available in 
engraved granite are 
border stones which 
line the outer rim of 
the brick around the 
planters, etched 
plaques which adorr 
the steps, and any ol 
the four planters 
which form the 
center of the Walk. 



Academics •*• 135 




Concerto Aria 




I < 1NCERT0 ARIA 
was held to give a 
professional atmo- 
sphere for the besl 
soln performers in 
the Buchanan 
School of Music. Ii 
also offered the 
community "a 
showcase of reallj 
fine talent, " said 
Timoth) Hanks, the 
conductor for 
Concerto Aria. 

The 
show- 
case of 
Samford's 
musical 
best 

Though n 
allowed to 
lapse for .1 number 

Tin 

d ol 



Photo In Mark Mantooth 



AMY KING, a student of Kevin Kozak. performed 
the Allegro from Strauss' Concerto No. 1 in E-flat 
Major. She is a member of the Samford Brass 
Quintet, the Horn Choir, and has served as an 
officer in the Samford University Wind Ensemble. 
She is a member of Delta Omicron, a professional 
music fraternity, and was an alternate in last year's 
Concerto Ana competition. 



Photo h\ Mark Mantooti 

ALLISON MILLER, a student of Becca Remley, 
performed a selection entitled Concertino, an 
orchestral piece written by French female composer 
and pianist. Chaminade. While at Samford, Miller 
has been a member of the Samford University Wind 
Ensemble. 

In high school. Miller performed with the 
All-State Band and Orchestra. 




Photo I 

MRI \\ FINCH, one Sue Shepherd's piano 

is. played the final movemenl from Mo/art's 
in B-flal major. Finch transferred to 
Fones l diversity. He is a 

n I Performing Arts Program. 

lerin las; oncertoAria 

iblication 



Photo h\ Mark Manlootm 

TODD JONES studied percussion with Tim Miller, I 
and performed two movements from Creston's 
( 'oncertino for Marimba. He has been a member of | 
the Wind Ensemble, the Jazz Combo, the Jazz 
Ensemble, and the Percussion Ensemble. In the fall 
of 1991. Jones studied at the Guildhall School of 
Music and Drama, in London. ,, , . ,, ... „.„ 

Taken from i. U. publication 



v 




, Philanthropy and the 


Aria 


A W^\\ THE FUNDING for 


Concerto Aria the 


help Concerto Aria. 


I „ • ' p? <&M. Concerto Aria was a 


past two or three 


He also 


IV WL id combination of a 


years, said Timothy 


established a piano 


1 ^^L Ci dtfJM*' 'JN 6 ^ budget allowance 


Banks, the Concerto scholarship in the 


L ^ mfc'l* & m^ from the school of 


Aria conductor. 


school of music. 


A ■ l\ mky^M music and a dona- 


Miller 


He supports 


A 1 Vv tion from Samford 


initially gave a 


the school of music, 


■ I jdjP/*:'^ trustee Malcolm 


donation when 


"because of his love 


^^^^^ 'VV •>%$,''' >* Miller, and his wife. 


piano professor 


of music," Banks 


9|H|^HH jfc/WU&fckfcW* Efl Mr. and Mrs. Miller 


Betty Sue Shep- 


said. 


V7j B v? '\ '^W;'^' | have donated to 


herd asked him to 


Storv by Rachel Dwvet 



Photo bx Mark Mantooth 




JOHN AUTRY (lower 
left) studied voice with 
Randall Richardson. His 
performance included 
Moore's Warm as the 
Autumn Light, and Largo 
al factotum, from Rossini's 
Barber of Seville. Autry 
has placed in many vocal 
and piano competitions 
including the Palm Beach 
Opera's Vocal Competi- 
tion, and the Birmingham 
Music Club's Scholarship 
Auditions. He has 
performed with the 
Alabama Symphony and 
made his opera debut with 
the Palm Beach Opera. 

Taken from S. U. publication 

ALLEN WARREN (left) 
a student of Jon Remley, 
performed Glazounov's 
Concerto for E-flat Saxo- 
phone and String Orches- 
tra. Warren, who per- 
formed in last year's 
Concerto Aria, is the 
principle saxophone in the 
Wind Ensemble, and is a 
member of the Saxophone 
Quartet, and of OMA, pro- 
fessional Music Fraternity. 

Taken from S. XI. publication 



The student 
participants for the 
Aria came from all 
aspects of the 
school of music, 
Banks said. They 
auditioned first 
before faculty 
members from their 
respective areas of 
concentration. In 
their final audition, 
the students came 
before judges who 
were professional 
musicians. The 
judges chose six 
participants plus one 
alternate, Banks 
said. The student 
musicians were 
required to choose 
compositions that 
conformed to the 
instrumentation of a 
standard orchestra, 
Banks said. 

Story by Rachel Dwyer 



Academics •* 137 




College Bowl 



n 



DR JIM FISK 
remembers watch- 
ing College Howl 
on tele\ ision in the 

l v, ni s and Ikis been 
.1 1. hi ever since. 
When the SGA vice 
president told him 
thai thej needed 
him to serve as 
faculty advisor for 
the Samford College 
Bowl, he agreed and 
has held that posi- 
tion for the past 
seven years. 

The var- 
sity sport 
of the 
mind 

I he game, 

not unlike the 

popular telev ision 
me shou ./< op- 
ntesl ol 
all types ol knowl- 




I, hut 



Photo by Buck Buchanan 

best scorers for the 

tall tournament 
were, in order, Doug 
>od. Jonathan 
v and Ann 
ek. 



•+Top: Phi Mu 

Alpha. 9-0 for the year, 
celebrates its fall '92 
championship victory 
with smiles and high 
fives. Above: B.S.U. 
sits pensively, trying to 



Photo bx Buck Buchanc 



determine the 
correct answer to a 
question. Above, right. 
Dr. Fisk prepares to 
begin the final round ol; 
College Bowl for fall 
'92. 






COSTA RICA 




Adventuresome Samford Students Spend 
Jan-Term in Central America 

SAMFORD STUDENTS turned up in 
places all over the globe, and a lucky few 
got to visit Costa Rica. Students who 
ventured south during January went to 
study Spanish, as well as to get a taste of 
Central American culture. Covered in the 
cost of the trip was tuition, airfare, a week- 
end cruise, a group trip to Poas (an extinct 
volcano), and payment for meals to the 
natives in whose homes the students were 
housed. 




Academics •*• 139 




Hanging of the Green 



: 



A 
Samford 
Christmas 
tradition con- 
tinues 




Right: 

Honored seniors are, 
from left to right, Kelly 
Fields, Matt Cook, Lisa 
Stagg, Mike Lunsford, 
April Robinson, Alan 
Burton, Lana Metcalf, 
Frank McCravy, 
Jennifer Davis, Hayes 
Purdue, Leslie Peacock, 
Jeff Stough, Monika 
Ikner, and Casey 
Fitzsimmons. 



HANGING OF the 

Green has been a 
part of Samford 
tradition for twelve 
years. It was started 
by Ginni Bridges, a 
past Campus Minis- 
tries director, and 
has grown into the 
Samford staple that 



it is now. 

changed a little at a 
time, making each 
program a little 
different each year, 
said Campus Minis- 
tries director Brenda 
Sanders. "It hasn't 
always been the 
campus event it is 



Photo by Entre Nous staff 

today." 

Twelve 
seniors were chosen 
as honorees of the 
service, two of 
whom were the 
Christ couple, 
Sanders said. The 
Christ couple 
narrated the service. 



Of the 
twelve honorees 
chosen, Sanders 
said, "they were 
selected for their 
leadership, scholar- 
ship. Christian 
example, and 
overall contribution 
to life at Samford." 



Above left 

Students attend a 
Christmastime Convo i 
the chapel, decorated It 
the Hanging of the 
Green. Above: Haye* 
Purdue and Jennifer 
Davis begin the 
Hanging of the Green 
ceremony by lighting ; 
window candle. 



Slon In K,i, Iwl l>Hu-r 



Academic •* 140 





FOUR FAMILIES 
of faculty and staff 
members were 
chosen by the 
Student Ministries 
Council to make 
and present a 
Chrismon for the 
tree in the chapel, 
Sanders said. Stu- 
dent Minstries 
supplied the materi- 
als necessary to 
make the 
Chrismons. 

The Samford 
families were: Dr. 
James and Dr. 
Rosemary Fisk, 
Gregory and Daniel; 
Dr. Ron and Kitty 
Jenkins, Benjamin 
and Anna Lea; Dr. 
Joseph and Dr. 
Constance Pedoto, 
and Stellina. The 
Students also chose 
Brenda Sanders "to 
show that a single 
person can be a 
family, too," Sand- 
ers said. 



Ston' b\ Rachel Dwxer 



Above, left: 

April Robinson and 
Alan Burton narrate the 
Hanging of the Green 
service, acting as the 
Christ couple. Above, 
right: Drs. Jim and 
Rosemary Fisk, and 
their sons Gregory and 
Daniel present a 
Chrismon to be put on 
the tree. Center: From 
left to right, Jessica 
George, Beth Bazemore, 
and Judy Perkins pass 
along the flame that will 
light up the darkened 
Reid Chapel. Left: The 
University Chorale, 
under the direction of 
Dr. Timothy Banks, 
provides music for the 
Hanging of the Green 
ceremony. 



Photo bx Kan- Harrell 



Academics •* 141 




Latif/Model U. N. 



Latif Addresses the United Nations 



MOST OF US will 
remember the 
second weekend of 
September in the 
fall of 1992 with a 
grimace at the 
thought of the 
Bulldogs' 55-0 loss 
to Auburn. There is 
at least one Samford 
student, though, 
who will always 
look back positively 
on that weekend. 
While the rest of us 
hit the highway 
heading south, 
Ambereen Latif was 
in a plane heading 
north to speak on 
behalf of her coun- 
try and her school. 

On Wednes- 
day, September 
ninth, Latif opened 



her mailbox to find 
a notice from the 
United Nations; 
mail that looked to 
her like "junk mail," 
which prompted her 
to throw it away. 
Not until the follow- 
ing day when she 
received a plane 
ticked did she take 
the situation seri- 
ously. In one day, 
she would be ad- 
dressing the U. N., 
and she didn't have 
any idea what she 
would say. That is 
when she sought the 
aid of Dean 
Franklin and Mr. 
Nunnely of informa- 
tion services. With 
their help, Latif 
quickly composed 



a short speech on 
the lack of action 
required to solve the 
unrest between her 
native Pakistan, and 



India and China. As 
she was chosen 
because she was a 
student, Latif spoke 
a bit about Samford. 



Below: In 

Convo, Ambereen Lai 
addresses issues on 
behalf of international 
students. 

Photo by Su ) 




Photo b\ Sicolu BraJr 



Society of International Affairs/ 

Model United Nations Students 

Travel to San Francisco 



Story b\ Rachel Dwver 



THE SOCIETY of International Affairs/ 
Model U. N. was a campus organization 
set up "to aid students in becoming more 
aware of global affairs," according to its 
president, Nicola Bradburn. The three- 
year-old program was comprised mostly of 
political science, history, and international 
relations majors; however, the organization 
was not exclusive to students in these 
fields. 

In the national Model U. N., col- 
leges sent students in character of the 
country they were representing. Last year, 
Bradburn, along with Heather Fordham, 
the group's vice president, Rachelle Gable. 
E. J. Smith. Mike Roberts, John Brewer, 
and David Young, attended the Model 
U. N. in San Francisco, California, repre- 
senting the Philippines. 

"Getting ready for the Model U. N. 
"requires a lot of preparation and strength- 
ens research skills," said Fordham. 




Once at the Model U. N., represen- 
tatives discussed and debated real issues 
facing the global community, such as 
placement of United Nations forces, and 
the rights of the people in given countries. 



Above: from left to 
right. Heather Fordham, E. J. Smith. | 
Nicola Bradburn. John Brewer. David 
Young, faculty advisor Dr. Gregory 
Jeane. and Mike Roberts. 



Academics ■* 142 



~ 



Brewer/Socratic Society 




he Socratic Soci- 
y: A New Group 
c Thinkers 



UNDER THE 

careful supervision 
of Dr. Sonny 
Tendian, the Socra- 



tic Society was born 
at the beginning of 
the spring semester 
of 1993. 

Photo b\ Mark Mantooth 




Above: Philanthropist 
: <alph Beeson and recipient Mark 
irewcr embrace, though Brewer's 
unds came from another sonrce. 



As of the 
end of the spring 
semester, the 
Socratic Society 
had, as yet, not 
received its charter, 
but was an active 
group, well on its 
way to becoming an 
official Samford 
organization. "A 
group of friends, in 
the ultimate analy- 
sis, is all the 
Socratic Society 
really is," said the 
Society's first 
president, Jonathan 
Caro. 

The purpose 
of the fifteen- 



member group was 
to continue to 
support intellectual 
activity within the 
University. "There 
is much available 
knowledge and 
experience, and this 
certainly isn't 
restricted to what 
occurs in class," 
said Caro. "The 
ideas of the indi- 
vidual are the most 
powerful of all." 

Left: From left to right, 
Dr Sonny Tendian. Jonathan Caro. 
Travis Hawkins. Cindy Nobles. Christina 
Gargiulo. David Binnix. Angie Barnhart. 
Scott Carter. Joy Nobles. Russ Patterson. 
Jennifer Bolton. Chad Grill, and David 
Reese. 



Samford Honor Student Receives 
National Award 



MARK BREWER, a history and geogra- 
phy major and Samford honor student, was 
named the winner of the Harry S. Truman 
Scholarship for Alabama. 

Over 500 colleges and universities 
across the nation submitted applicants' 
names to the Truman Foundation in Wash- 
ington, D. C. There, the 1000-plus student 
applicants' files were reviewed, and final- 
ists were chosen for each state. Finalists 
were interviewed by a board of local public 
servants, and a winner was chosen. 

Seventy-five to 85 scholarships are 
available each year. The $30,000 scholar- 
ships are awarded to students who express 
an interest in public service, and is in- 
tended to aid in graduate studies. 

Brewer plans to use the money to 
finish his undergraduate degrees, and then 
hopes to attend either Colombia Univer- 
sity, Georgetown University, or a univer- 
sity in the United Kingdom, to complete 
graduate studies in International Affairs. 



Academics •> 143 



Index 



A 




Abernathy, 


Baggiano, 


Pam 65 


Tana 120 


Abner, Allan 


Baggiano, 


49 


Toni 


Acker, Jade 


115, 120, 124 


123 


Bailey, 


Adams, 


Byram 40 


Ashley 117 


Bakersfield, 


Aikes, Amy 


Chris 40 


81 


Ball, Jeff 


Allen, Paulie 


121 


49 


Bartlett, 


Allen, Will 


Heidi 119 


37 


Bartlett., 


Alvarez, 


Heather 14 


Tony 40 


Battles, Mike 


Anderson, 


40 


Julianne 14 


Beard, Jeff 


Archer, Jeff 


34, 49 


68, 69 


Beasley, Ron 


Armistead, 


97 


Ann 74 


Beck, Andy 


Ashcraft, 


97 


Malinda 64 


Beiersdoerfer, 


Ashley, Amy 


Heidi 71 


40 


Belcher, 


Austin, Jay 


Melissa 11 


49 


Bell, Dan 


Authoris, 


125 


Roland 40 


Bell, Tammy 


Averns, 


87 


Myles 76 


Berger, 




Cindy 40 




Beth, Laura 




Large 4 




Bethune, 



David 12 

Bethune, 
David, 14 

Betts, 
Sandra 
114, 115, 124 

Blanton, 
Christie 
14, 37 

Bobbitt, 
Michael 36 

Bolin, Liesl 
106 

Boshears, 
Joe 125 

Bowden, 
Terry 40, 42 

Bowman, 
Shannon 16 

Brady, John 
59, 60 

Breen, Pat 
74, 75 

Brewer, Matt 
119, 31 

Bridges, Kim 
40 

Britt, Walter 
40 

Brooks, 
David 118 

Brown, Allan 
40 

Brown, Ray 
39 

Browning, 
Matt 95 

Buford, 
Charles 48 

Burton, Alan 



116 

Burton, 
Celeste 111 

Byrum, Gary 
11 




Caldwell, 
Ben 127 

Call, Tom 
40 

Campos, 
Aaron 74 

Cancienne, 
Wayne 14, 76 

Capehart, 
Megan 72 

Carpenter, 
Mike 40 

Carrol, 
Hunter 40 

Carson, Jay 
125 

Carter, April 
89 

Carter, Sh- 
annon 32 

Caudell, 
Todd 11, 119 

Cheek, Amy 
25, 106 

Cherry, 
Jenny 62 

Clayton, 
Kathy 111 

Clift, Rachel 
68 



Clouser, 
Katie 111 

Cofield, Ty 
40 

Colavita, 
Jackie 
101, 111 

Coley, 
George 110 

Collier, 
Kristen 
101, 108 

Collins, 
Sherman 40 '' 

Conque, 
Clint 40 

Cook, Jennii 
32 

Cook, Matt j 
125, 25 

Cooley, Jon 
40 

Corey, 
Jenny 111 

Costner, 
Walter 40 

Cox, Kim- 
berly 83 

Craig, Karl 
40 

Crow, 
Christy 125 

Crumpton,? 
Jenni 14, 62} 

Culp, 
Charles 
49, 51 



144 •* Index 





Dale, Mike 


D'Ambra, 
ason 76 
| Danford, 
ulie 111 

Daniel, Dana 
4 

Davenport, 
pey 
4, 56, 57, 60, 61 

Davidson, 
oigie 35 

Davis, Jenni- 
2r 113, 105 

Davis, Roger 
25 

Decembert, 
risco 40, 41, 
■2 

Deitz, Brock 
■0 

Dickinson, 
oigie 72, 73 

Dickson, 
■en 74, 75 

Donnelly, 
'atrice 40 

Duckworth, 
ermaine 40 

Dunn, Brian 
'8, 111 

Durgin, 
larcus 
■0, 42, 44, 48 

Dutton, 
lope 127 

Dwyer, 
Rachel 7 



Eads, Chad 
40 

Eagar, 
Melanie 81 

Eason, 
Olandus 
54, 55, 57, 58, 60 

Edwards, 
Patrick 40 

Edwards, 
Rebecca 106 

Edwards, 
Surkano 40, 
42, 44, 47, 48 

Ellis, 
Heather 126 

Ellis, Lee 
40, 42, 43, 44 

Emerson, 
Bobby 40, 45 

Erickson, 
Kari 35 



w 



Featherman, 
Shannon 76 

Ferguson, 
Rebecca 108 

Fields, Kelly 
125 

Fields, Lisa 
13, 111 

Finch, Brian 
8 

Fisher, 
Bryan 



40, 44, 46 

Fisher, 
Jimbo 40 

Fitzsimmons, 
Casey 123 

Fleming, 
David 115 

Fleming, 
Judd 34 

Ford, Mike 
37 

Foster, 
Amanda 32 

Fowler, 
Jenny 11 

Franklin, 
Kenya 
54, 57, 58, 59, 60 

Franklin, 
Richard 9 

Friedel, 
Scott 40 

Fuqua, Jerry 
40 

Furey, Susan 
111 

Furlow, Kris 
252 




Gibbons, 
Robbie 40 

Gierhart, 
Jeff 49 

Gilbert, Joel 
97 

Gillispie, 
Chris 40 

Glenn, 
Cathy 111 

Golden, 
Carlton 
40, 42, 43, 44 

Gooch, 
Donny 71 

Graham, 
Andrew 40 

Graham, 
Donja 40 

Green, 
Melanie 111 

Green, Ron 
40, 44, 46 

Green, 
Tonya 1 6 

Greene, Ron 
47, 122 

Greene, 
Tonya 63 

Guest, Beth 
87 



Gaither, 
Nikki 252 

Gann, Lee 
49, 52 

Gardener, 
Jennifer 68 

Gassner, 
Scott 14 

Gautier, 
Juan 
68, 69, 70, 71 




Hackbarth, 
Mel 40, 44 

Hadden, 
Lynn 31 

Hage, Brett 
49 

Haley, Brit- 



tany 74, 75 

Hall, Lesley 
87 

Hampton, 
Dan 71 

Hancock, 
Marti 83 

Harris, 
Adrian 40 

Harris, Brad 
105 

Harris, Ed 
40 

Harris, Eric 
62 

Hart, 
Jonathan 54 

Hartley, 
Caldwell 40 

Hausier, 
Ann 126 

Hawkins, 
Rodney 
40, 45, 47 

Hawkins, 
Travis 107 

Hays, Jodie 
54 

Hazzard, 
Bethany 119 

Heise, Amy 
13 

Hemphill, 
Charlotte 104 

Henderson, 
Andrea 124 

Henshaw, 
Jon 33 

Henson, 
Craig 
31, 100, 109 

Herman, 
David 



INDEX-* 145 



54, 56, 57, 61 

Hermansson, 
Jan 75 

Hicks, 
Heather 
70, 71 

Hill, Angie 
14 

Hill, Stuart 
74 

Hines, 
Damian 
40, 42, 44, 45 

Hines, Jack 
40 

Hodgson, 
Brenda 108 

Holcomb, 
Lisa 81 

Holbert, 
Brooke 14 

Holder, Jay 
99 

Holley, 
Kevin 99 

Hooks, 
Wyatt 
40, 43, 45 

Howard, 
Chandra 
74, 75 

Hudson, 
Heather 126 

Huffstatler, 
Greg 40 

Hurston, 
Martha 1 1 1 

Hutchinson, 
Joe 49 

Hvde, Craig 
105" 

Hyland, 
Renee 81, 



120 



Ierulli, Tony 
40 

Ikner, 
Monica 

114, 115, 118, 
123 

Ingram, 
Dawson 40 

Isbell, 
Melodi 125 

Ivey, Billy 9 



jj 



Jackson, 
Keith 40 

Jackson, 
Kevin 8 

Jackson, 
Shayne 85 

James, Tory 
40, 43, 45 

Janecka, 
Marcel 74 

Jarvis, An- 
drea 31 

Johnson, 
Erick 40 

Johnson, 
Kacy 65 

Jones, 
Jarrod 54 

Jones, 
Kenny 40 

Jones, 



Patrick 107 

Jones, 
Jarrod 58 

Joyner, 
David 76 

Justus, Karl 
40 




Karwoski, 
Melissa 
64, 65, 66, 67 

Kenney, 
Megan 71 

Kent, Allison 
126 

Knight, 
Wendy 103 

Kolb, Joy 
12 

Kruse, Lisa 
83 

Kuehnert, 
Tim 53 




L, Dr. G. 
Black 104 

Lambda, 
Akash 74, 75 

Lanehart, 
Brian 109 

Lankford, 
Ross 34 

Latham, 
Jennifer 1 1 1 

Lawrence, 



Drew 49 

Lawrence, 
Ryan 40 

Lawson, 
Richard 93 

Lee, Allison 
114 

Lee, Jason 
40 

Lee, Shan- 
non 14 

Letson, 
Ricky 127 

Lewellen, 
Melissa 87 

Lipscomb, 
Greg 40 

Little, 
Deandra 111 

Little, Don 
40 

Lockwood, 
Jessica 119 

Logan, 
Kelsey 77 

Loscuiko, 
Jason 40 

Love, Anto- 
nio 40 

Lowe, 
Patrick 35 

Lucas, Brian 
97, 49 

Luker, Karen 
106 

Lundy, Scott 
37, 93^ 

Lunsford, 
Mike 32, 105 

Luttrell, 
Travis 
31, 100, 109 

Lyden, Sean 



68, 70, 71 

Lysle, 
Samantha 
105 







: 



Magee, 
Wendell 
40, 49, 50, 5; 

Mahanes, 
David 33, 93 

Mangus, 
Brad 40 

Manley, Lee 
76 

Mansell, 
Alice 101 

Mansell, 
Scott 40 

Mantooth, 
John 54 

Mantooth, 
Mark 111 

Marshal, 
Kent 49 

Marshall, 
TeDarryl 
40, 46 

Martin, 
Christine 87 

Martin, 
Heather 101 

Mathis, Su- 
san 16 

Mattes, 
Lance 40 

Matthews, 
DeWitt 
54, 55, 60 

May, Brian 



1 



i 



; t 



! 



146 •* Index 



40, 44 

McClure, Bill 
69, 70, 71 

McClure, 
Mike 71 

McClurkan, 
Robert 127 

McCool, Tim 
40 

McCosh, 
Scot 113, 
115, 122, 
126, 68, 7 1 

McCravy, 
Frank 32 

McEachin, 
Joe 107 

McFadden, 
Scott 40 

McFarlin, 
i Larry 13, 40 

McGehee, 
Lisa 87 

McKie, 
Charles 40 

McManus, 
Angela 87 

McRae, 
Kathy 125 

Meeks, Eliza- 
beth 125 

Mellard, 
fcheal 14 

Messer, 
viichael 69 

Milam, Scott 
40 

Miles, Steve 
40 

Miller, Joel 
40 

Miller, 
tonni 14 



Milsted, 
Collyn 119 

Minacs, 
Derek 
49, 50, 52 

Mixon, Amy 
25, 107, 4, 248 

Mixon, Joel 
8, 10, 4 

Mixon, Katie 
111 

Mizel, James 
40 

Moak, 
Donna 65 

Mobley, 
Chad 40, 42, 
44 

Montgom- 
ery, Derek 40 

Montgom- 
ery, Rebecca 
69 

Morris, 
Heath 14 

Morris, Jeff 
40 

Morrow, 
Allison 
64, 65 

Mosley, 
James 40 

Motley, Eric 
37 

Mowry, Sara 
126 

Mullen, 
John 49 

Murphree, 
Jason 14 

Murphy, 
Allen 40, 44 

Murray, 



Darrell 
40, 46 



49 

Osborne, 
Kim 127 




Noblitt, 
Vince 40 

Nolen, Jim 
73 

Nolen, 
Russell 40, 49 

Norris, 
Melonie 126 

Norton, 
Natalie 99 

Nowell, Sean 
31, 100 




Oelschlager, 
Kim 72, 73 

Ogden, Josh 
40 

Oliphant, 
Lisa 111, 68 

Olivares, 
Marcel 74 

Olivastro, 
Rich 40 

O'Neal, 
Corey 40 

O'Neal, 
Michael 
40, 42, 43, 46, 
48 

Opalinski, 
Brett 105 

Orr, Michael 




Packer, 
Brister 40, 43 

Paradis, 
Kathryn 111 

Pardue, Bev 
40 

Parker, 
Emily 83 

Parks, 
Brenda 62 

Patel, 
Jaishree 119 

Patenotte, 
Dennis 40 

Pautienus, 
Robert 68, 71 

Peacock, 
Leslie 127 

Peeler, Rie 
111 

Perkins, 
Jeremy 
40, 42 

Perry, Ryan 
40, 46 

Perryman, 
Paul 31 

Peterson, 
Jamie 40 

Phillips, 
John 68, 71 

Pitts, Cory 
125 

Pixley, 
Jonathan 



54, 57, 58, 59, 60 

Plemons, 
Andy 40 

Poor, 
Heather 40 

Powley, Amy 
119 

Preston, 
Jason 71 

Pursley, Ovit 
40 




Quinn, Hugh 

74 




Randle, 
Jarrod 74 

Randies, 
Brian 102 

Redd, Amy 
111 

Reed, 
Jesselyn 
74, 75 

Remley, Jon 
100 

Reynolds, 
David 105 

Reynolds, 
Orlando 40 

Richardson, 
Beth 32 

Richardson, 
Mindi 111 

Richardson, 



INDEX •* 147 



Tim 40 

Roberts, 
Jody 40 

Robertson, 
Jon 115 

Robinson, 
April 
115, 116 

Robinson, 
Stefanie 77 

Rolison, 
Mike 40 

Rowe, Eliza- 
beth 104 

Ruggiero, 
Tony 76 

Rushing, 
Burt 13 

Russell, 
Melanie 87 



Saies, Judith 
77 

Saies, Sarah 
77 

Sample, 
LeAnn 126 

Sanders, 
Brenda 114, 
115, 116 126^ 127 

Sanders, Jeff 
49 

Scarborough, 
Corky 49, 50 

Schumann, 
Kari 32 

Schuingframmer, 
Kristen 77 

Scotch, Amy 



74 

Seay, 
Monica 35 

September, 
Donovan 75 

Shackleford, 
Bethany 
123, 127 

Shaner, 
David 252 

Shaw, 
Jamelle 77 

Sheafe, 
Bubba 
54, 59, 60 

Shelton, 
Michelle 77 

Sherer, 
Leigh 
10, 14, 104 

Shields, 
Gordon 97 

Shiell, Bill 
115, 127, 105 

Shirey, Bo 
40, 49 

Shoup, Tim 
69, 71 

Siler, Bonnie 
111 

Silverstein, 
Debra 31, 
127 

Skinner, 
Brook 66 

Skipwith, 
Eric 40, 42 

Smith, 
Anissa 68 

Smith, Brad 
54, 55, 57, 59, 60 

Smith, Ed 
40, 47 



Smith, Mike 
40 

Snow, Kelly 
122, 70, 71 

Snow, Matt 
99 

Sparks, 
Holly 
114, 123 

Sparks, Katie 
64, 65, 66, 67 

Speights, 
Jennifer 102 

Spencer, 
Jamie 14 

Spivey, Billy 
106, 107 

Staley, 
Derek 40, 42 

Steed, Dick 
49 

Steele, Card 
49, 53 

Stevens, 
Mark 31 

Stinchcomb, 
Bob 40 

Stites, Cheri 
85 

Stoltz, Becky 
10 

Strawbridge, 
Vince 93 

Stroud, 
Todd 40 

Stuart, Mike 
68 

Summers, 
Shannon 89 

Sweet, 
LuChrysta 71 

Swords, Jeff 
125 



T 



Tate, 
Michael 14 

Taylor, Mary 
Ann 107 

Thomas, 
Mark 40 

Thompson, 
Collin 40 

Thompson, 
Ian 76, 77 

Thornbrough, 
Ken 49 

Tillman, 
Shellie 68 

Tilton, Jesse 
107 

Townsend, 
Tiffany 
99, 111 

Traylor, 
Richard 10 

Treadwell, 
Rebecca 74 

Triplett, 
Tiffany 120 

Tripp, Shan- 
non 11 

Troll, Kelly 
63 

Trotter, 
Dara 40 

Trummell, 
Jason 34 

Truss, David 
54, 55, 59, 60 

Tuck, Gerald 
49 

Tucker, 



Holly 72 

Tucker, 
Laura 111 

Turner, Eric 
40 

Tyler, 
Marysha 40 





Verchot, 
Kristy 87 

Verlander, 
Alan 49 

Vernon, Jon 
40, 43 




Wade, Renee 
8 

Waldrip, 
Stephanie 40 

Waldrop, 
Manse 49 

Walker, 
Craig 68, 69 

Walker, 
Sandy 108 

Walker, 
Tommv 
49, 52^ 

Wallis, Jason 
37 

Warren, 
Alan 110 



148 •* Index 



Waters, 
Connie 73 

Watson, 
Nancy 12 

Webster, 
Tony 34, 49 

Wells, Kyla 
65, 67 

Wells, Lisa 
69, 70, 71 

Wevster, 
Tony 51 

White, David 
49, 51 

Whitney, 
Laura 40 

Wicker, Ben 
40 

Wiggins, Ben 
4} 41, 42 4$ 45 46 

Williams, 
Shawn 40 

Williams, 
Yvonne 111 

Wilson, Jen- 
nifer 14 

Wilson, Jute 
40 

Winchester, 
Joey 40 

Winthrow, 
Andy 40 

Wise, Jenni- 
fer 74, 75 

Wise, Jill 74 

Withrow, 
Andy 49 

Wood, Tim 
71 

Woolf, 
Amanda 
72, 73 

Woosley, 
Leigh Ann 81 



Word, 
Michael 40 

Wright, 
Laura 32 

Wuerslin, 
Diane 68, 71 




INDEX ^ 149 



•» In front of a 
teepee set dressed 
as an indignant 
squall, Amy Mixon 
particpates inWee 
Little Wigwams, a 
play put on for 
community children. 

Photo by K.T. Harrell 




OF PASSAGE 




reached the end. . . # The end of an 
era as the once proud Crawford John- 
son men's dorm surrendered its 
guardianship over the quad. * The end 
of a stage of life as the graduating se- 
niors bid a fond farewell to friends and 
faculty. & The end of a school year as 
underclassmen stood ready to return 
to Samford in the fall.® The end of a 
semester as a well-deserved and hard- 
earned calm and peacefulness fell over 
the campus.* The end of these Rites of 
Passage as each of us thoughtfully, 
though hesitantly, accepted our adult 
responsibilities as we claimed our Rites 

tO Ascension.* Tiffany Townsend 



150 •* Closing 




STAFF 




Editor: 

Tiffany Townsend 

Campus Life Editor: 

Lisa Oliphant 

Athletics Editor: 

Melanie Green 

Campus Ministries 
Editor: 
Jackie Colavita 

Academics Editor: 

Mark Mantooth 

Mini Mag Editor: 

Bonnie Siler 

Orgs/Greeks Editor: 
Brian Dunn 



Entre Nous Faces 
Editor: 

Jennifer Latham 

Photo Editor: 
Buck Buchanan 



CLOSING ■» 151 



•» "Spike" readies 
himself for the big 
game against 
Auburn, though 
minutes later he 
injured his hind leg. 

Photo hy K.T. Harrell 



OF PASSAGE 




ur Rites of Passage during the past 
year challenged us in many areas of 
life. ?^ The Rites of the Game dared us to 
compete and excel.* Rites of Initiation 
encouraged us to join and become in- 
volved. $ Rites of Knowledge inspired us 
to learn and understand, o The Rites of 
Service urged us to minister and give 
of ourselves with love.* Our willingness 
to use all that we gained from our jour- 
ney emboldened each of us as we ea- 
gerly accept our Rites to Ascension* 

Tiffanv Townsend 



152 •* Closing 




COLOPHON 



The theme of the 1993 
Entre Nous 
encompassed all 
aspects of student life 
here at Samford 
University. Each and 
every Samfordite 
undergoes a series of 
changes, his or her 
Rites of Passage. 
Sticking to a classic 
look the cover is 
lithograph, one color, 
with two grains. The 
logo is embossed in 
bronze, while the 
spine is hotstamped. 
Typestyles include 
New York, Helvetica, 
and Monaco. 
The 1993 Entre Nous 
staff was advised by 
Dr. Edna Ellison until 
her departure in 
January. Many 
thanks to Bill Wolfe, 
our Delmar 
representative, who 
came from Atlanta to 
help us. And thanks 
to Lou Arnold for 
supplying last minute 
pictures. Dean 
Franklin and Gail 
Sawyer came through 
again this year under 
adverse conditions, 
and we thank them for 
their willingness to 
help. 



CLOSING •* 153 




O ASCENSION 




Buck Buchanan 



•* Kris Furlow, Nikki Gaither and David Shaner enjoy the fun and festivities of the Spring Fling activities 
sharing the day with friends. 











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